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Bishop’s Flower

Quick Facts:

    • Attracts beneficial insects
    • Nice cut flowers
    • Open pollinated seeds
    • Blooms mid- to late summer

Bishop’s Flower

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Description:

Ammi majus. This open pollinated variety is the natural species version of False Queen Anne’s Lace. It looks good in almost any setting, adding a touch of naturalistic beauty. The stiff, upright stems bear giant, 15cm (6″) wide umbels of tiny white flowers, and these act as a magnet for beneficial insects. Not only do the flowers attract and feed pollinators, but they also attract a host of predatory insects that will scour the garden looking for pests to eat. Lacewings, ladybirds, hover flies, and parasitoid wasps all take up residence where Bishop’s Flower is planted, and they do a terrific job of minimizing damage from aphids and caterpillars. It’s useful as a cut flower.

Annual.

Quick Facts:

    • Attracts beneficial insects
    • Nice cut flowers
    • Open pollinated seeds
    • Blooms mid- to late summer

How To Grow

False Queen Anne’s Lace or Bishop’s Weed are common names for this attractive, naturalistic looking annual flower. Ammi grows stiffly upright stems topped by umbelliferous flowers that are attractive to pollinators and predatory insects. Flower heads can reach 15cm (6″) across, and are lovely in flower arrangements. Read below to find out how to Grow Ammi from seed.

Latin
Ammi majus
Family: Apiaceae

Difficulty
Easy

Exposure: Full sun to light shade
Zone: 3-9

Timing
Start seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost. That’s the first to third week in February on the south coast of BC. Transplants can go out 3-4 weeks after last frost. Or direct sow outdoors in early spring when the soil is still cool and a light frost is still a possibility. Ammi can also be direct sown in late autumn. Seeds should germinate in 7-25 days.

Starting
Just cover the small seeds. If starting indoors, wrap planted seedling trays or pots in plastic and place in the refrigerator for 1-2 weeks. Then grow in a bright, cool place at 12°-18°C (55°-65°F).

Growing
Thin or transplant seedlings to 30cm (12″) apart in richly fertile soil. Ammi prefers cool, moist soil. Water regularly until plants are established, and then only during hot, dry weather.

Annual.

[description action=”end”][quickfacts action=”start quickfacts”]

  • Attracts beneficial insects
  • Nice cut flowers
  • Open pollinated seeds
  • Blooms mid- to late summer

[quickfacts action=”end quickfacts”]”>

Ammi Majus is the species name for Bishop's Flower, which is also known as False Queen Anne's Lace, and is a great companion plant to attract beneficials.

BISHOP’S WEED

Ajava Seeds, Ajowan, Ajowan Caraway, Ajowan Seed, Ajowanj, Ajwain, Ajwan, Ameo Bastardo, Ammi Commun, Ammi Élevé, Ammi glaucifolium, Ammi Inodore, Ammi majus, Ammi Officinal, Bishop’s Flower, Bisnague, Bullwort, Carum, Espuma del Mar, Flowering Ammi, Grand Ammi, Omum, Yavani.

  • Overview
  • Uses
  • Side Effects
  • Interactions
  • Dosing

Overview Information

Bishop’s weed is a flowering plant. The seeds are used to make medicine.

Bishop’s weed is used for asthma, chest pain (angina), kidney stones, a skin disorder that causes white patches to develop on the skin (vitiligo), and scaly, itchy skin (psoriasis), but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Be careful not to confuse bishop’s weed (Ammi majus) with its more commonly used relative, khella (Ammi visnaga).

How does it work?

Bishop’s weed contains several chemicals that can make the skin more sensitive to sunlight.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Asthma.
  • Chest pain (angina).
  • Kidney stones.
  • Fluid retention.
  • Scaly, itchy skin (psoriasis).
  • White patches to develop on the skin (vitiligo).
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of bishop’s weed for these uses.

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if bishop’s weed is safe. It might cause nausea, vomiting, and headache. Some people are allergic to bishop’s weed.

When applied to the skin: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if bishop’s weed is safe. It may cause the skin to become extra sensitive to the sun. This might put you at greater risk for skin cancer. Wear sunblock outside, especially if you are light-skinned.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy: It’s LIKELY UNSAFE to use bishop’s weed if you are pregnant. It contains a chemical called khellin that can cause the uterus to contract. This might threaten the pregnancy.

Breast-feeding: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if bishop’s weed is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Bishop’s weed might slow blood clotting. There is a concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using bishop’s weed at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions ?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with BISHOP’S WEED

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.
Bishop’s weed might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking Bishop’s weed along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking Bishop’s weed, talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver.
Some medications changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) interacts with BISHOP’S WEED

Bishop’s weed might harm the liver. Taking bishop’s weed along with medication that might also harm the liver can increase the risk of liver damage. Do not take bishop’s weed if you are taking a medication that can harm the liver.
Some medications that can harm the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), isoniazid (INH), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), methyldopa (Aldomet), fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), erythromycin (Erythrocin, Ilosone, others), phenytoin (Dilantin), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and many others.

Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs) interacts with BISHOP’S WEED

Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Bishop’s weed might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking bishop’s weed along with medication that increases sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.
Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with BISHOP’S WEED

Bishop’s weed might slow blood clotting. Taking bishop’s weed along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.
Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of bishop’s weed depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bishop’s weed. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Learn more about Bishop’s Weed uses, effectiveness, possible side effects, interactions, dosage, user ratings and products that contain Bishop’s Weed