CBD Oil With Low Thc

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What does the law do? When choosing a non-medical cannabis product, consider using low-THC products that contain greater than four percent CBD, as this may help to avoid or lessen intoxication. CBD and THC are both derived from cannabis plants, but they’re very different. Learn the differences between CBD and THC.

Low THC Oil – FAQ for General Public

Georgia’s medical marijuana law allows certain qualified persons to legally possess up to 20 fluid ounces of “low THC oil,” which is derived from the marijuana plant. It authorizes the Georgia Department of Public Health to issue a “Low THC Oil Registry Card” to qualified persons, which will prove that they are authorized to have the oil and protect them from arrest.

How does Georgia’s law compare to laws in other states which have adopted medical marijuana?

Georgia’s law is much more limited than some other states’ medical marijuana laws. For example, it does not legalize the sale or possession of marijuana in leaf form and it does not authorize the production or sale of food products infused with low THC oil or the ingestion of low THC oil through vapor. It does not authorize physicians to prescribe marijuana for medical use. It is intended solely to protect qualified persons from criminal prosecution for possessing low THC oil for medicinal purposes.

Who is eligible for the “Low THC Oil Registry Card”?

There are three categories of persons who may apply for the card:

  1. an adult who has one or more of the diseases specified in the law;
  2. legal guardians of an adult who has one or more of the diseases specified in the law;
  3. parents or legal guardians of a minor child who has one or more of the diseases specified in the law.

What conditions or diseases are covered by the law?

The law lists the following conditions and diseases which qualify for the Low THC Oil Registry:

  • Cancer, when such diagnosis is end stage or the treatment produces related wasting illness or recalcitrant nausea and vomiting
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, when such diagnosis is severe or end-stage
  • Seizure disorders related to the diagnosis of epilepsy or trauma related head injuries
  • Multiple sclerosis, when such diagnosis is severe or end-stage
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Mitochondrial disease
  • Parkinson’s disease, when such diagnosis is severe or end-stage
  • Sickle cell disease, when such diagnosis is severe or end-stage
  • Tourette’s syndrome, when such syndrome is diagnosed as severe
  • Autism spectrum disorder, when (a) patient is 18 years of age or more, or (b) patient is less than 18 years of age and diagnosed with severe autism
  • Epidermolysis bullosa
  • Alzheimer’s disease, when such disease is severe or end-stage
  • AIDS when such syndrome is severe or end-stage
  • Peripheral neuropathy, when symptoms are severe or end-stage
  • Patient is in hospice program, either as inpatient or outpatient
  • Intractable pain
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder resulting from direct exposure to or witnessing of a trauma for a patient who is at least 18 years of age

What if more than one person is caring for the child or adult?

If there is more than one parent or legal guardian, then each may apply for a separate card.

How do I apply for the Low THC Registry Card?

The application is actually sent in by the physician who is treating the patient. There are two forms. First, there is a waiver form which must be signed by both the applicant and the physician. Second, there is a physician

certification form. The physician will keep the original waiver and certification form in the patient’s medical records. You may request a copy. The physician will electronically submit the information from these forms to the Georgia Department of Public Health, which will review the information and create a Low THC Oil Registry Card for qualified applicants.

Where will I get my Low THC Registry Card? Will it be mailed to me?

You will be notified when your card has been printed. A representative from DPH’s Office of Vital Records will contact you to establish which of 20 Public Health Offices across the state is most convenient for you to pick up your card. A representative from the Public Health Office selected will notify you when your card is available for pick-up.

How much does the card cost? How do I pay for it?

The fee for a Low THC Registry Card is $25 per new card, which is the standard fee used by the Office of Vital Records. You will be asked to pay for your card when you pick it up from the closest of the 20 Public Health Offices approved to distribute them.

How long is the card valid?

The card will be valid for two years from the date it is issued. The expiration date will be printed on the front of the card. After that time, you will need to again consult with your physician and request that they update and confirm your information into the registry. Please plan to allow 15 business days to process your information, print your card and have it ready for pick-up from the closest of the 20 Public Health Offices approved to distribute them to the address you list as your residence in the registry.

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What happens if I lose my card?

If you lose your card, please contact the State Office of Vital Records at 404-679-4702 option 4. If your card has not expired, your physician will be contacted to confirm you are still under their care. Once confirmed, a replacement card will be provided to you. Please plan to allow 15 business days to process your information, print your card and have it ready for pick-up at your closest Public Health Office. Replacement cards will cost $25.

The information on my card is wrong or outdated. How do I correct it?

If the information on your card is wrong or outdated, please contact the State Office of Vital Records at 404-679-4702 option 4. Vital Records will verify the information provided by your physician on your order. If the information on the order is incorrect, you will need to contact your physician and ask that they update the information. At that time a new card will be issued.

Can I alter or laminate my card?

Cards can be laminated; however, a card is void if any changes are made to it.

Where can I buy low THC oil?

Under House Bill 324, the Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission, which is administratively assigned to the Secretary of State’s Office, will oversee the growing, manufacturing, and dispensing of low THC oil in Georgia. The Georgia Department of Public Health does not prescribe or dispense low THC oil.

Is marijuana now legal? Where can I buy it?

No. The law only authorizes the legal possession of up to 20 fluid ounces of low THC oil by qualified persons. It does not make the sale or possession of all types of marijuana legal in Georgia. Possession of any form of marijuana by an unauthorized person is and remains a violation of state and federal law.

Can I now sell medical marijuana?

The Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission will issue a limited number of licenses for the growing, manufacturing, and dispensing of low THC oil in Georgia. It is a violation of state and federal law for unauthorized persons to sell any form of marijuana.

High-CBD, low-THC products: how they stack up for the holidays

When choosing a non-medical cannabis product, consider one that could mitigate some of the potential risks of intoxication or overuse. Using low-THC products that contain greater than four percent CBD may help avoid or lessen intoxication.

What is cannabidiol (CBD)?

CBD, also known as cannabidiol, is the second most common cannabinoid found in cannabis. It is generally found in low percentages in most strains, but its effects are more pronounced when found in quantities above four percent. Any strains containing greater than four percent CBD are considered high-CBD. High-CBD strains of cannabis are generally considered to be less intoxicating and high percentages of CBD may counteract the intoxicating effects of THC.

Look for low-THC products

If you want to avoid or lessen intoxication and reduce the risk of experiencing negative side effects, you may wish to choose products that contain significantly more CBD than THC. Potency can be determined by reading the label and looking for total THC and CBD percentages. Although CBD is not thought to provide the “high” you may have come to expect from cannabis, it is still considered to be psychoactive and may modify brain function and potentially result in changes in mood and perception. When used alongside THC, you may still experience mild euphoria.

High-CBD oils and capsules

If you prefer not to smoke or vape cannabis, BC Cannabis Stores carries high-CBD oils and capsules that may provide similar effects. Keep in mind that it can take significantly longer to feel the effects of ingested cannabis products than products that are inhaled. Start low, go slow and wait after using cannabis products. Effects from inhalation can be felt within seconds to minutes and may last up to six hours, whereas it can take between 30 minutes and two hours for the effects of ingested cannabis to be felt and they can last up to 12+ hours.

As with all cannabis products, the experience will vary between individuals based on a variety of factors.

No matter what cannabis products you may choose to use this holiday season, avoid using cannabis with other substances and take extra care if you do mix cannabis with alcohol or other substances. With the holidays approaching, remember, don’t drive high.

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What’s the difference between CBD and THC?

Cannabis consumers have long prized potency (a high THC content) as a primary factor for strain popularity and desirability. This traditional demand for THC has caused an over-saturation of high-potency products, though many consumers now prefer less intense products lower in THC and higher in the non-intoxicating compound called CBD (cannabidiol). Both have unique properties that make them ideal for all your weed needs.

CBD vs. THC: Key differences

THC and CBD are both cannabinoids derived from the cannabis plant, but they’re different in many ways that may influence your next dispensary purchase.

An easy way to think about it is that THC is defined by effects that cannabis makes you feel. CBD will not intoxicate you, or get you high.

What is CBD?

CBD is one of the most abundant cannabinoids found in various strains of the cannabis and hemp plants, with a long list of holistic and medicinal benefits. Like THC, the human body absorbs it via a system of cannabis-friendly receptors called the endocannabinoid system, which helps regulate everything from sleep cycles to immunity to reproductive health.

But unlike THC, CBD doesn’t bind to the system’s primary CB1 and CB2 receptors; rather, it helps regulate how these receptors and cannabinoids interact.

It can also counteract some of the intoxicating effects of THC by binding to other cannabinoid receptors, and will keep THC from activating those receptors. This translates to a less intense psychoactive effect, making products with a mix of CBD and THC great options for first-time consumers.

This does not mean that CBD, by itself, cannot offer a beneficial effect. High doses of CBD often produce a profoundly relaxing experience with ample internal perks. Like stepping out of a hot tub, your body may feel tingly and relaxed, and your brain may be clear.

Breeding the house specialty: Waterloo is a low-THC, high-CBD strain unique to Compassionate Cultivation. (Photo: Ben Adlin)

What is THC?

THC is the star cannabinoid of the weed world. It imparts cannabis’ beloved high sensation, and its use for treating numerous medical maladies via the plant has been cited in medical texts for thousands of years. It was first discovered and isolated in Israel in 1964, and high-THC weed remains the world’s most widely-consumed illicit substance.

THC primarily binds with the body’s CB1 receptors, which abound in the brain and central nervous system, as well as the eyes and spleen.

The intensity of THC’s effects can change when combined with other cannabis and terpenes as part of the entourage effect theory, which argues that “various cannabis compounds work together to create unique effects and benefits.”

CBD vs. THC: Legality

Currently, 37 states plus DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have medical marijuana programs with both CBD and THC products; 18 states have legal adult use laws. The passing of the Farm Bill in December 2018 made industrial hemp a legal agricultural commodity in all 50 states.

However, the legality of hemp-derived CBD may vary from state to state, so it’s important to check your state’s laws before stocking up on hemp-derived CBD products.

Marijuana and THC are classified as Schedule I substances and remain illegal at the federal level. Strains that have a high CBD:THC ratio are legal only in states with legal, regulated cannabis markets.

CBD vs. THC: Molecular structure

On a molecular level, THC and CBD have a lot in common. They resemble the endocannabinoids our bodies naturally produce, and both contain 21 carbon atoms, 30 hydrogen atoms, and 2 oxygen atoms. They diverge in the structures that connect these atoms, which impacts how they bind to different receptors and catalyze the release of neurotransmitters in the human body. This accounts for their distinct effects on consumers.

CBD vs. THC: Psychoactive components and effects

The molecular differences between CBD and THC contribute directly to their difference in effects on the body and endocannabinoid system. THC’s molecular structure fits perfectly into CB1 receptors and mimics the effects of endocannabinoid anandamide, which signals the brain to release dopamine—hence, the high. CBD’s atomic arrangement means it does not bind well to CB1 and CB2 receptors, but its presence can counteract the presence of THC binding, as well as influence the efficacy of other neurotransmitters in the body.

CBD vs THC: Medical benefits and effects

In the limited body of marijuana research, cannabinoids like THC and CBD have shown to work most effectively when in tandem with one another, terpenes, and other minor marijuana compounds in a synergy called the entourage effect. But both can help address a number of conditions in isolation.

CBD medicinal effects

The list of conditions CBD may help with continues to grow and evolve. Despite ample self-reported and studied evidence, more research is still needed to better understand the efficacy and range of CBD’s benefits for humans and animals with endocannabinoid systems. Many use CBD and CBD-based products to manage the following symptoms and conditions:

  • Epilepsy and seizure disorders
  • Pain and inflammation
  • PTSD and anxiety
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Insomnia
  • Opioid withdrawal
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Though clinical and anecdotal evidence suggests CBD can help manage different conditions, CBD became most famous for treating a rare and debilitating form of pediatric epilepsy. Dravet’s Syndrome is notoriously resistant to current treatment methods. People with the condition are plagued by seizures, often up to hundreds a day, and they usually worsen as people age and can be life-threatening.

Currently, treatment methods include having a child wear an eyepatch, specialized diets, and brain surgery, but all have mixed success rates.

One of the earliest CBD success stories involved a young girl with Dravet’s Syndrome named Charlotte Figi, who at five years old was given an ingestible oil derived from Charlotte’s Web, a high-CBD cannabis strain specifically developed to provide her with all the benefits of the plant without the high.

In less than two years, Charlotte went from a monthly seizure count of 1,200 to about three. Other success stories followed and more parents have begun to speak out, particularly parents desperate for access to this life-saving treatment.

Though Charlotte passed in April of 2020 at the age of 13, she far outlived the prognosis given to her before starting CBD treatment, which predicted she wouldn’t live past eight.

In 2018, the FDA approved Epidiolex, the first CBD product federally approved to treat Dravet’s Syndrome. The DEA has scheduled it as a Schedule V substance.

THC medicinal effects

While the euphoria that comes with smoking, dabbing, eating or ingesting weed doesn’t officially count as a medical treatment, high-THC cannabis and byproducts have a long history of mitigating mental and physical health symptoms and conditions.

Many patients find that a balance of CBD and THC offers the best symptom relief as the two work together synergistically, and they overlap in treatment, but THC is particularly effective in relieving the following symptoms and conditions.

  • Pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Glaucoma
  • Loss of appetite

How to find the best CBD cannabis product for you

CBD has no lethal dose or known serious side effects, and many of THC’s negative side effects have been debunked as based on bad-faith research. Using cannabis-derived compounds for pediatric conditions remains a touchy subject in a culture rife with cannabis stigma. We recommend doing your own research and speaking with a medical professional familiar with cannabis and how it may benefit you. If you live in a legal state, Leafly can help you find a doctor.

What are some high-CBD strains I can try?

Before human intervention, cannabis grew wildly with much lower cannabinoid levels than present day. Most cannabis strains are bred for potency and high THC, with less than 1% CBD or other cannabinoids. CBD is typically the second-most abundant cannabinoid in cannabis, but this isn’t always the case. A strain may deliver CBD and THC in the following ratios:

  • High THC, low CBD (e.g.,10-30% THC,
  • Balanced CBD/THC (e.g., 5-15% THC and 5-15% CBD)
  • High CBD, low THC (e.g., 5-20% CBD, THC under 5%)

Typical levels of CBD & THC in marijuana

By and large, most of the weed you’ll find in dispensaries and on the black market has been grown to exhibit as much THC as possible. Most pre-packaged flower sits at around 20% THC, and

High-CBD strains tend to deliver very clear-headed, functional effects without the euphoric or sedating highs associated with high-THC strains. They suit consumers who are extremely sensitive to the side effects of THC (e.g., anxiety, paranoia, dizziness).

A high-CBD strain also benefits anyone needing to medicate throughout the day to control pain, inflammation, anxiety, or other chronic conditions.

Balanced CBD/THC strains feel more euphoric than CBD-dominant strains, though they’re much less likely to induce anxiety, paranoia, and other negative side effects. Strains like these tend to be the most effective for pain relief, and they’re also well-suited for THC-sensitive consumers who’d like a mellow buzz.

You can smoke or vaporize CBD-rich flower, eat a CBD-infused edible, swallow a CBD oil capsule, apply a CBD lotion, or use a CBD tincture sublingually, just high-THC products. Hemp products also contain CBD, though it is a less efficient source and lacks the beneficial chemical diversity of cannabis-derived CBD products (more on that here).

Keep in mind that CBD levels may vary from crop to crop—even from plant to plant. We also recommend checking with dispensaries about the specifics of their strains’ CBD levels, and purchasing only lab-tested products that clearly state the CBD/THC levels, so you know what kind of experience to expect.

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