CBD To Oil Ratio

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Learn how to make your own CBD oil at home to be used as a supplement, in cannabis-infused recipes, and even self-care products. Selecting quality cannabis products takes some time and careful consideration. Knowing what is in the products you choose is important. This printable cannabis flower to oil ratio guide will help you decide how much to use so you end up with a perfectly potent product.

Easy Homemade CBD Oil Recipe

Published: Mar 9, 2021 · Modified: Aug 8, 2022 by Emily Kyle · This post may contain affiliate links, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Are you ready to learn how to make your own CBD oil to be used as a supplement, in recipes, or for self-care products? This guide will give you the step-by-step process and show you how easy it is to make the best CBD oil at home.

Features

  • Two natural ingredients: CBD flower & oil
  • No special equipment! You just need a crockpot and mason jars (or an Instant Pot)
  • Versatile and can be made with your favorite strain of CBD flower

Why You Will Love This Recipe

If you are familiar with making homemade cannabis oil, this canna oil recipe follows the same process.

The only difference is the type of cannabis flower you start with and how you decarb that flower.

For this recipe, you need CBD-dominant flowers. CBD is the second most abundant cannabinoid found in cannabis plants, next to THC, and is commonly found in the hemp plant.

CBD does not produce a high or intoxicating effect like THC, which is why it is preferred by many members of my Well With Cannabis Community.

Their anecdotal evidence suggests that this homemade CBD oil can be good for managing joint pain, serious medical conditions, weaning from prescription medications, and as a supplemental dietary product.

This step-by-step guide will show you how easy it is to make your own CBD oil at home with just a few simple steps, notes, and expert tips for how to make your own CBD recipes, and fully answered FAQs.

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Join thousands of members inside my private Well With Cannabis Community to ask questions, find support, and share your edible creations!

Ingredient Notes

  • CBD Flower To make CBD oil at home, you must start with a CBD-dominant flower that has CBDA already present. You can purchase this from my online shop here.
  • Oil There are many options to choose from. Choose a type of oil that fits your personal preferences. Unsure what to pick? Check the options below.
  • Lecithin, optional: If you’re new to working with lecithin, you can learn more about adding lecithin to edibles here. This ingredient is optional.

Carrier Oil Options:

Note: a complete list of ingredients with amounts and printable instructions is located in the recipe card below.

The Step-by-Step Process

Step 1 – The goal is to create a hot water bath at approximately 180-190°F for the infusion process. The printable instructions in the recipe card below are for using a crockpot, but alternative options are outlined in the FAQ section below.

Step 2 – While the water bath is heating in the crockpot, measure and decarb the CBD flower. This is an essential step! Simply break the flower into smaller pieces, put it in a mason jar, and place that in the oven at 240° F for 90 minutes. Alternatively, can learn how to decarb in an Instant Pot.

Step 3 – Add your desired oil to the mason jar with the decarbed cannabis. If you plan to use sunflower lecithin, add it to the mason jar.

Step 4 – Carefully place the jars into the water bath, put the crockpot lid on, and leave it alone to cook for 4 hours. You want to maintain a temperature of around 180-190°F the entire time. If you don’t have a lid, aluminum foil will work. After the 4-hour cooking time, carefully remove the jars from the water bath and allow them to cool enough to handle. You are now done with the crockpot step and can discard the water bath.

Step 5 – Whether it be a paper filter and funnel, cheesecloth, French press, fine mesh strainer, or a simple coffee filter, you will want to set up a straining station to separate the plant material from the oil.

Step 6 – Once cool enough to handle, strain the prepared oil with your method of choice. You can save the plant matter, called leftover cannabis pulp, for use in future recipes.

Step 7 – Return the prepared CBD oil to whatever jar you would like to store it in; I use a small amber tincture dropper bottle.

Step 8 – Store the prepared CBD oil in a cool, dry place. It will last longer if stored in the refrigerator and even longer if stored in the freezer.

Note: complete step-by-step printable instructions are located in the recipe card below.

Storage Instructions

Store the prepared CBD oil in a cool, dry, dark place at room temperature. The shelf life will depend on various factors, including what type of oil you used and how much moisture was in your flower. The CBD hemp oil will last longer if stored in the refrigerator and even longer if stored in the freezer. The lower temperature will help to preserve the potency of your product.

More About CBD Flower

Cannabis comes in a variety of different strains with a variety of different cannabinoids and cannabinoid ratios.

While many people are familiar with traditional, THC-dominant cannabis flowers, there is also CBD-dominant cannabis flower or industrial hemp flower.

Third-party lab tests are the best way to identify what cannabinoids are present in your flower and how much CBD content is present.

CBD-dominant flowers may come with either high or low amounts of THC; it all depends on the strain of the plant.

You can read my full CBD flower guide here if you’re still unclear about CBD flowers.

CBDA to CBD Conversion

Once you have acquired the CBD flower needed to make this CBD oil recipe, the next step is to decarboxylate the CBD flower.

While you may be familiar with the traditional decarboxylation process for making traditional THC cannabis-infused oils, it is slightly different for making CBD-infused oil.

See also  CBD Oil For Crohn's

This process converts cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) into cannabidiol (CBD), although both forms remain non-intoxicating in their respective states.

It is important to remember that all cannabinoids decarboxylate at different temperatures, so the temperature and time needed to achieve full activation for CBD will differ from THC.

The most common recommendation for decarboxylating CBDA to CBD is to bake the flower at 240°F for 90 minutes.

Notes & Expert Tips

  • Making your own homemade high-quality CBD oil with the following recipe is one of the best ways to reap the health benefits of CBD and other beneficial compounds
  • Using pure CBD products, like isolates, will not produce a full-spectrum CBD oil because it does not contain a full spectrum of cannabinoids. Therefore, you may not experience the therapeutic effects of CBD
  • Use the flower-to-oil ratio guide if you need help deciding how much to use. It’s a good idea to record how many flowers you used, in grams, so you can calculate your final potency with the edible dosage calculator.
  • Once made, you can use this oil in a variety of recipes from edible recipes to beauty products! Click here to learn how to make your own CBD edibles

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of the most frequently asked questions I receive in my Well With Cannabis Community about making CBD oil at home.

If you want to make this recipe at home using high-quality CBD flowers, I have them available for purchase in my shop. Check with your local laws to ensure full-spectrum oil is a legal option for you.

No, you do not need to use a slow cooker or crockpot, but it is a great way to set it and forget it! You can use a double boiler or a small saucepan on the stove over low heat to create a water bath for infusion.

Yes, if you want a stronger, more potent infusion, you can make CBD oil with full-extract cannabis oil, also known as FECO. This is a different process than what is outlined here and involves making a cannabis tincture with the alcohol extraction method, so be sure to follow my FECO guidelines here.

The answer depends on the cannabis flower you’re using. Some flower can contain high amounts of both CBD and THC, while other flowers, like CBD hemp flower, contains low amounts of THC. If you want to ensure you are not getting high from your final product, you want to opt for a CBD-dominant flower with little to no THC.

Many people feel nothing at all when they use CBD. Using CBD is not about what you feel; it is about what you don’t feel – a lack of unwanted symptoms. Just like all things cannabis, how you feel will be entirely dependent on your own unique tolerance to cannabis.

When it comes to getting drug tested, it is important to know that using a CBD product containing any THC amount can result in a positive drug test result. If you need to be free of THC, you need to ensure the product you are using is labeled as a broad-spectrum CBD or CBD isolate product.

Yes, you can. If you want to make a smaller batch first, to see if homemade CBD oil is right for you, use this cannabis flower-to-oil ratio guide.

You can use this oil as a sublingual tincture or learn to cook with CBD oil and make these delicious CBD oil chocolate chip cookies.

How to Determine The Dosing

Want to get a more accurate guesstimate of the potency of your cannabis infusions and extractions? Try our popular edibles calculator!

Not sure what your perfect dose is? Learn more here.

Want To Make This Easier? Use A Machine!

If the process of decarbing and infusing feels like too much work, an all-in-one countertop device may be a perfect all-in-one solution.

My personal favorites? The LEVO and Ardent FX, but you can review the most popular infusion machines here.

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More Oil Recipes You Will Love

My Edibles Made Easy Online Cooking Course will teach you how to easily make cannabis edibles and topical recipes at home. This step-by-step video course will teach you how to infuse, extract, and create edibles with many different product types – all from the comfort of your own home.

Learn more and enroll today →

Easy Guide to Make CBD Oil

Are you ready to learn how to make your own CBD oil to be used as a supplement, in recipes, or for self-care products? This guide will give you the step-by-step process and show you how easy it is to make the best CBD oil at home.

Equipment

Ingredients

  • ▢ 7 grams CBD-dominant cannabis flower
  • ▢ 4 ounces oil of choice
  • ▢ ¼ teaspoon lecithin optional

Instructions

Lay a clean tea towel down on the bottom of the crockpot. This will create a buffer between your mason jars and the crockpot, potentially preventing any jar from moving or cracking during cooking.

Fill your crockpot with enough warm to hot water to cover the top of the mason jars you plan on using by an inch to create a water bath.

Place the digital instant-read thermometer into the water. Start the crockpot heat on high. When a temperature of around 180°F is reached, turn the crockpot to low. Note: any temperature range of 180-190 degrees Fahrenheit will work. You may need to adjust to medium heat, depending on your crockpot.

While the water bath is heating in the crockpot, measure decarb the CBD flower. Simply break the flower into smaller pieces, put it in a mason jar, and place that in the oven at 240° F for 90 minutes. Click here, for a full CBD decarboxylation tutorial, if needed. Record how much flower you used, in grams, so you can calculate your final potency at the end.

After decarboxylation, remove the jar from the oven. When it is cool enough to handle, open the lid and put your oil of choice inside. You may need more than one jar if you are making a big batch. If you are using more than one jar, evenly divide the ingredients between the jars for more consistent dosing.

Wipe the rim of the jars with a clean towel, and add the lid. Tighten the metal ring to finger-tip tightness. It should be tight, but not too tight.

See also  Does CBD Oil Absorb Through Skin

Carefully place the jar into the hot water bath, put the crockpot lid on, and leave it alone to cook for 4 hours. You want to maintain a temperature of around 180-190°F the entire time. If you don’t have a lid, aluminum foil will work.

After the 4-hour cooking time, carefully remove the jars from the water bath and allow them to cool enough to handle. You are now done with the crockpot step and can discard the water bath.

Prepare a straining area with new, clean mason jars and a strainer, paper filter, cheesecloth or French Press. Pour the contents of the mason jar through the strainer to separate the plant-matter from the infused oil.

Save the leftover cannabis pulp for use in future recipes. Then return the prepared CBD oil to whatever jar you would like to store it in, like an amber glass jar with a dropper.

Notes

Storage Instructions: Store the prepared CBD oil in a cool, dry, dark place at room temperature. The shelf life will depend on a variety of factors including what type of oil you used and how much moisture was in your flower. The CBD hemp oil will last longer if stored in the refrigerator and even longer if stored in the freezer. The lower temperature will help to preserve the potency of your product.

Nutrition

Serving: 1 teaspoon Calories: 55 kcal Carbohydrates: 1 g Fat: 6 g Saturated Fat: 6 g Fiber: 1 g Sugar: 1 g Calcium: 1 mg Iron: 1 mg

Did you make this recipe or have a question? Join hundreds of members inside private Well With Cannabis Community for help, support, and to share your edible creations!

Understanding CBD:THC Ratios

Selecting quality cannabis products takes some time and careful consideration. Knowing what is in the products you choose is important. Knowing how much of each of those ingredients or components is in a product – not just the amount but also the ratio of one key ingredient to another – is also key to anticipating the potential effects that product may produce.

When we’re talking about cannabis products, the term “ratio” typically refers to the ratio of CBD to THC. These types of ratios can be expressed as CBD:THC (the amount of CBD versus THC).

As we discussed in “The Entourage or Ensemble Effect”, the relationship between THC and CBD is interesting because it is both complementary and antagonistic meaning they both work together in some ways, but in other ways, they work to modify the effects of the other.

Here are some examples of ratios and what those ratios could mean:

40:1 – 40 parts CBD to 1 part THC. This ratio contains a significantly higher amount of CBD that will impact the way the low amount of THC works overall. The focus of a product with this combination is on the benefits of CBD.

18:1 – 18 parts CBD to 1 part THC. With a higher CBD content compared to the THC content, this ratio is not overly psychoactive and can be a good starting point for someone new to CBD or THC.

8:1 – 8 parts CBD to 1 part THC which is more of a mid-range amount of CBD. Again, the CBD content dominates the THC content for a tempering effect that minimizes overt psychoactivity.

4:1 – 4 parts CBD to 1 part THC. This ratio still has a CBD content higher than the THC, which is in the mid-range, but the THC will produce some more pronounced psychoactive effects.

2:1 – 2 parts CBD to 1 part THC. There could be more overt psychoactivity depending on a person’s THC tolerance level since this ratio is a little more equal, with less CBD to temper the THC.

1:1 – 1 part CBD to 1 part THC. While this ratio looks the most balanced, it will actually produce more of an overall psychoactivity and may be better suited for a person with a higher tolerance to THC.

Picking the right ratio is an individual thing – no two people’s bodies or brains (or endocannabinoid systems) are alike. If a person is a novice, a reasonable place to start is at the ratio with the highest amount of CBD versus the THC content. Over time, easing into trying ratios with higher THC will, inevitably, produce different effects but how strong is to be determined person to person.

Cannabis Flower-to-Oil Ratio Guide & Printable Chart

Published: Nov 9, 2021 · Modified: Sep 4, 2022 by Emily Kyle · This post may contain affiliate links, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Are you ready to make cannabis butter or oil but are stuck wondering how much to use? This cannabis flower-to-oil ratio guide will help you decide how much so you end up with a perfectly-potent end product suited to your tolerance and needs.

Features

  • An easy-to-use guide to determine how much flower, kief, or trim and how much oil or butter to use in your infusions
  • Expert tips to help you determine your tolerance level
  • An option to download and print both the 1:1 and 1:2 chart

Why You Will Love This Guide

Edibles are a great way to consume cannabis to find relief from unwanted symptoms, but if you’re buying them from a dispensary, the costs can add up.

That’s why so many of my Well With Cannabis Community members love to save money by making edibles at home.

This can be done with a simple infusion of cannabis flower and fat like butter, coconut oil, or olive oil.

But the same question is always asked, how much cannabis and oil should I use?

It’s a great question because how much of each you decide to use will impact the potency of your final product.

This guide will discuss how you can determine the perfect flower-to-oil ratio for your infusion so you can get your chill on and save money simultaneously!

How to Use The Ratio Chart

The easy-to-use chart above will help you decide how much flower and oil to use based on how big you want your final batch to be.

This works for infusions that are made in a crockpot, Instant pot, or even an infusion machine, depending on the capacity it can hold.

The chart has two parts, a 1:2 ratio (1 ounce to 2 cups) and a 1:1 ratio (1 ounce to 1 cup).

See also  CBD Oil Botanicals

But which chart should you use?

One of the best parts about making cannabis infusions is that you can make them as strong or mild as you prefer.

If you have a low tolerance or are looking for a mild dose, you should use the 1:2 ratio chart listed first.

If you have a high tolerance or are looking for a stronger dose, you can reference the second chart and use a 1:1 ratio.

For a 1:1 example, one ounce of decarboxylated flower will be mixed with one cup of butter.

This will create an infusion twice as potent as if you were to use the 1:2 ratio.

When deciding which ratio to pick, consider your tolerance, and if you’re new to edibles, be sure to follow the golden rule of “start low and go slow.”

Other Factors to Consider

As a general rule, it’s essential to know that the more cannabis flower you add to your infusion, the more potent your edibles will be.

You can also increase the potency by decreasing the amount of oil or butter to get the same effect.

My flower-to-oil ratio chart above breaks it down so you can easily and accurately mix the right amounts – but there are a few other factors to consider as well.

The Potency Of The Flower

While the amount of flower and oil you use matters, so does the potency of the flower you’re using.

Cannabis flowers can contain anywhere between 0-30% cannabinoids or the important compounds we want like CBD, CBG, and THC.

Different strains can have different percentages of cannabinoids. Without lab testing, it is impossible to know this exact number.

If you purchased cannabis from a dispensary, it should come with a lab report or printed number stating the total percent of cannabinoids in the product.

If you grew your flower and know the strain you used, online resources like Leafly should be able to give you an average percentage of what the strain typically produces.

Remember, the higher the percentage of cannabinoids, the more potent the final infusion will be.

If You’re Working With Trim

The chart above is was designed with the thought that you would be using traditional cannabis flower buds.

But what if you want to make an infusion with trim or shake?

If you’re working with trim, I typically recommend you double the amount of “flower” in the cart.

This is because trim, like fan leaves or sugar leaves, is typically less potent than flowers, so doubling up on the amount will help keep the potency higher.

Of course, this is just a rough guesstimate, and will again depend on the strength of the flower and your personal tolerance.

If You’re Working With Kief

Again, the chart above is was designed for using cannabis flower buds.

However, if you’re lucky enough to have collected a nice amount of kief, you can easily infuse it into butter or oil.

If you’re working with kief, I typically recommend you *at least* halve the amount of “flower” in the cart.

This is because kief has the potential to be anywhere between 50-70% more potent than traditional cannabis flower due to its high trichome content.

Take care when preparing a kief oil or kief butter, as they can be very potent depending on how they are made.

A Calculator Can Help

While it is no substitute for lab testing, an online calculator can help you determine the potency of your final product.

For this to work, you will need to know the potency of the material you are working with or at least have a general idea.

You can input values into my edibles dosage calculator and see the final potency before infusing.

Get To Know Your Tolerance

By changing the amount of flower to oil in your recipe, you can manipulate the final product to be as potent as you’d like.

The more flower you use, the more potent it will be. The more oil you use, the more you will dilute the infusion.

Since cannabis affects everyone differently and the endocannabinoid system is highly individualized from person to person, it’s essential to know your tolerance level.

Cannabis enthusiasts agree that the best way to consume THC edibles safely is to “start low and go slow.”

That way, you are less likely to experience the unpleasant side effects of too much THC consumption, like anxiety and paranoia.

It’s always advised to start with a low flower-to-oil ratio for your first batch of edibles and see whether it meets your needs.

If it’s not as potent as you’d like, you can try a stronger ratio next time.

To find the perfect ratio for your tolerance level, keep experimenting with different amounts of cannabis flower and oil.

Once you’ve got the right potency, you’ll be able to make all kinds of edible recipes at home on your own.

Traditionally, cannabis brownies are a fan favorite, but you can make anything from cookies and candies to no-bake edibles and more with your infusions.

Whether you’re just beginning your journey into homemade cannabis-infused treats, or if you’re a seasoned baker, this flower-to-oil ratio chart will help as a quick guide.

Looking For More Support?

Join thousands of members inside my private Well With Cannabis Community to ask questions, find support, and share your edible creations!

Want To Make This Easier? Use A Machine!

If the process of decarbing and infusing feels like too much work, an all-in-one countertop device may be a perfect all-in-one solution.

My personal favorites? The LEVO and Ardent FX, but you can review the most popular infusion machines here.

Want A Discount Code?

My Edibles Made Easy Online Cooking Course will teach you how to easily make cannabis edibles and topical recipes at home. This step-by-step video course will teach you how to infuse, extract, and create edibles with many different product types – all from the comfort of your own home.

Learn more and enroll today →

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