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I planted a clementine seed. Now what?

Several months ago just for fun I planted a seed from a clementine (or maybe it was a mandarin) in a flower pot using some organic potting soil. The pot is 8 inch in diameter and 7 inch tall and has drainage holes. To my surprise, it is doing very well, especially as we have been putting it out during the daytime in this North East U.S summer. It’s now about a foot tall with new leaves sprouting all the time. Being a total novice in this area, I’m seeking some guidance about what to expect and what to do. Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

o Am I supposed to be feeding the plant? If so, with what and how often?

o How do I know when to replant it in a larger pot?

o I’ve seen various estimates for how large it might eventually grow. As I can’t plant it outdoors, given our cold winters, will it eventually be feasible to keep it inside in a room with a normal

8 ft ceiling height and is there something I can do to restrict its growth without harming it?

o The last sentence in this article (Which came first, the Clementine or the seed?) is confusing and I don’t understand what it implies as far as being able to eat any eventual fruit from the plant : Clementine is seedless only if grown in isolation. Don’t you be tempted to plant any of these seeds, though, because if the seedlings were to bear fruits, they would not, of course, be Clementines.

2 Answers 2

The explanation for the sentence you find confusing is, if you plant a seed from a clementine fruit,it won’t come true, meaning any fruit you might get is very unlikely to be a clementine – it may turn out to be a sour orange, or a smaller fruit that is bitter, there’s no way of knowing. Be warned that some citrus plants grown from seed may want to get huge, maybe 40 feet high, before they will produce any fruit at all.

Growing things from fruit seeds may be an interesting exercise and fun, but don’t bank on getting any edible fruit eventually. You will need to keep it indoors over winter, then harden it off in springtime to leave outdoors in summer, before bringing it back inside again (preferably in a cool room with good daylight) as you live somewhere too chilly in winter for it. Do not feed at this time of year – the growing season is coming to a close, now that the days are getting shorter and fall/autumn approaches.

As for when you need to pot up into something bigger, that’s hard to say because its been planted from a clementine fruit seed, so its unpredictable – usually it’s when the topgrowth looks too big and heavy for the size of pot its sitting in, often with a stunted appearance to new growth. Whether you will be able to keep it in a pot long term also depends on what actually grows – it might be one that just keeps getting bigger because it wants to get 40 feet, or it might not.

I planted a clementine seed. Now what? Several months ago just for fun I planted a seed from a clementine (or maybe it was a mandarin) in a flower pot using some organic potting soil. The pot is

How to Grow Clementines & Mandarin Oranges From Seeds

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A variety of Mandarin orange widely grown in the Mediterranean region and the United States, Clementine oranges (Citrus Reticulata ‘Clementine’) can be grown from seed in the same way as any other variety of Mandarin orange. Best suited to U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 to 11, Clementines cannot tolerate freezing temperatures. Clementine and other Mandarin orange trees can be easily grown from seed.

Remove the seeds from the fruit. Rinse the seeds under lukewarm tap water. Rinse off any juice and remove all fruit flesh from around the seeds. Any fruit left around the seeds will rot when planted in the soil and could result in mold or fungus that might destroy the seeds.

Place the seeds in a cup of lukewarm tap water and let them sit for 24 hours. Although soaking the seeds in water before planting is not necessary for germination, it does increase the chance of the seeds germinating successfully. Note: If you do not intend to plant the seeds right away, dry them completely and then put them in an airtight container. This prevents the growth of microorganisms. Storing them in cool or even cold location until you’re ready to plant is also essential to prevent seed destruction.

Plant each seed into a 3-inch pot. Plant the seed 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep into a rich but well-drained potting soil with a neutral or slightly acidic pH balance. Water the soil of the pot until it is soaked and let it drain.

Cut one or two small holes into a small transparent bag. Place the bag over the top of the pot so that it acts as a barrier, keeping heat and moisture in over the surface of the pot. Secure the bag in place, if necessary, with an elastic band around the base of the bag and top rim of the pot.

Place the pot near a bright window or outside on a bright balcony where it will receive a few hours of direct sunlight each day. Remove the bag to water whenever the surface of the soil appears dry.

Remove the plastic bag after the seedling emerges and outgrows the space provided within the bag. Water the seedling whenever the surface of the soil appears dry.

Transplant the small tree after roots appear around the drainage holes of the pot. The Mandarin seedling can be planted in a larger pot for patio or even indoor growing, or outside in an area of the yard where it will not be crowded or shaded from direct sunlight.

How to Grow Clementines & Mandarin Oranges From Seeds. A variety of Mandarin orange widely grown in the Mediterranean region and the United States, Clementine oranges (Citrus Reticulata ‘Clementine’) can be grown from seed in the same way as any other variety of Mandarin orange. Best suited to U.S. …