How Many Seeds Can A Weed Plant Produce

Almost any plant can be considered a “weed,” even those we cultivate as crops or ornamentals, if they are able to survive and successfully reproduce or spread in the new environment. Volunteer corn growing in soybean fields, aggressive groundcovers and tree seedlings that sprout in the garden are considered weeds because, by definition, a weed is simply a “plant out of place” If you’ve ever wondered how many weed seeds per pot is ideal, you are in the right place. Read our detailed guide on factors determining the number of seeds you plant.

Weeds: The Survivors

Purslane is a common and persistent garden weed because a single plant can produce 52,000 seeds and broken off stem pieces will develop roots and continue to grow.

Linda Naeve,
Program Specialist
Iowa State University Extension

On the popular reality television show “Survivor,” contestants are eliminated from the competition by others until only the winner remains. If a group of herbaceous plants were put through a comparative competition, it is very likely that a weed species would win the million dollar prize. The reason is adaptability. The common weeds that invade our landscapes share a similar characteristic – their ability to adapt and thrive in man-influenced habitats.

Almost any plant can be considered a “weed,” even those we cultivate as crops or ornamentals, if they are able to survive and successfully reproduce or spread in the new environment. Volunteer corn growing in soybean fields, aggressive groundcovers and tree seedlings that sprout in the garden are considered weeds because, by definition, a weed is simply a “plant out of place” or an invader.

Some plant species become weedy pests because they possess specific attributes or characteristics that allow them to succeed and thrive in disturbed areas.

Ability to survive in cultivated soil
Many annual weeds, such as crabgrass, purslane, common ragweed, lambsquarter and redroot pigweed, produce an abundance of seeds. According to a former weed specialist from North Dakota, one common purslane plant will produce 52,000 seeds! If only a few seeds produced by that plant grow to maturity and set seed, there would be more than enough to create a serious weed problem in a garden or field for years to come. Because of this, it is important to control annual weeds in gardens and lawns before they flower and set seed.

Another survival mechanism many weeds possess is the survival of its seed. Seeds of many weed species can survive and remain dormant in the soil for several years until conditions are favorable for germination. For example, seeds of common ragweed can survive nearly 40 years in undisturbed soil. Only a portion of the seeds in the soil germinate each year, leaving a reserve for future years.

Some of the worst weeds to control in cultivated areas are those that spread by underground perennial roots or stems, such as Canada thistle and quackgrass. Tilling areas infested with these pests quickly multiplies their numbers because broken root or stem pieces have the potential to become new plants. These plants are best controlled with spot treatments of a non-selective herbicide, such as Roundup®, that kill the entire plant, roots and all.

Competitive ability
Many weed species grow rapidly and shade the less vigorous, cultivated plants. The lack of adequate light causes poor crop growth and production. Some weed species are also greedy when it comes to soil nutrients and water, shorting our cultivated plants of these essential items.

See also  Free Weed Seeds Virginia

Ability to tolerate unfavorable habitats
Some plants, such as knotweed and plantain, can tolerate compacted soil where turfgrass won’t grow. Seeds of drought and heat tolerant weed species germinate and grow in very adverse places, such as cracks in sidewalks.

Ability to withstand repeated cutting or mowing
Despite frequent mowing, weeds in lawns and pastures are able to survive because they avoid the mower blades with their low stature or sprawling growth habit. Also, some species, such as dandelions and crabgrass, are often able to bloom and set seed between mowings.

Don’t let weeds become the last “Survivor” in your lawn and garden. The best way to compete with weeds is to prevent them from becoming established. This can be accomplished by learning more about the life cycle of common weeds and using the most effective control strategy for each species. In gardens and landscapes, weeds can be controlled by mulching, frequent cultivation or hand weeding. Prevent weeds from invading your lawn by maintaining a thick, healthy turf so that there are few bare spots where weeds can germinate and grow. If herbicides are used, the appropriate product should be applied when the weed is most vulnerable to that product and there is minimal risk to non-target plants and the environment.

Contacts :
Linda Naeve, Horticulture, (515) 294-8946, [email protected]
Jean McGuire, Continuing Education and Communication Services, (515) 294-7033, [email protected]

One print quality photo is available for this week’s column: 8505purslane.jpg

How many weed seeds per pot should you plant?

Cannabis growing is easy but takes time to master. To better your chances of success, you need to get the basics of weed growing right from the beginning. For instance, you should know how many weed seeds per pot are required and the factors that’ll shape your decision.

Based on the type and quality of weed seeds, we’ll help you determine the number of marijuana seeds you need.

Understanding seed types

When buying seeds to grow weed plants, you’ll have to choose between feminized and regular cannabis seeds. They differ from each other and affect your results.

Regular seeds

Regular seeds develop into female and male plants at a 2:3 ratio, but only females bud. To increase your chances of getting a female plant, you’ll need to plant several cannabis seeds per pot.

When you do this, remember to remove the males before they fertilize females and reduce their potency.

Feminized seeds

Feminized marijuana seeds are harvested from weed plants treated with a silver solution which inhibits ethylene production. Ethylene is a crucial element in the sex-determination process in weed plants.

The resulting cannabis plants produce anthers filled with female genetic material only. After fertilization, almost 100% of the resulting marijuana seeds develop into female weed plants.

Seed quality and germination rates

The quality of cannabis seeds you purchase will also affect how many weed seeds per pot are required.

See also  Weed Seeds Chicago

Fresh marijuana seeds have high germination rates, so you can plant fewer marijuana seeds per pot and get good results. Have in mind that weed seeds are fragile and as such, you should germinate them before planting.

Now, despite having high germination rates, germination isn’t 100% guaranteed. It’s, therefore, prudent to purchase extra seeds to grow weed to avoid inconveniences.

For instance, if you want one marijuana plant, we recommend buying three regular weed seeds or two feminized weed seeds.

When dealing with regular seeds, the rule of thumb is to buy twice as many seeds as the plants you want.

How many seeds do you need to grow a weed plant in a pot?

The ideal method of growing cannabis is following the one-pot rule, but some scenarios require multiple cannabis seeds per pot.

One seed: can you grow a weed plant with one seed?

Cannabis plants are annuals, meaning they take a short time to mature. They bloom in about two or three months and need enough space and care to grow healthy.

With that said, here are some pros and cons of growing a single weed seed in a pot.

Advantages
  • Roots have enough room to spread

Root growth depends on the number of weed seeds per pot and the space available. With sufficient space, the roots can grow wider and deeper to take up nutrients and oxygen. As a result, the weed plant will grow wider, taller, and produce denser and larger buds.

Restricted root growth leads to weak cannabis plants with great intermodal distance.

  • There’s no competition for nutrients

The number of cannabis seeds per pot determines how much the plants will compete for nutrients. With multiple cannabis plants per pot, competition will be stiff.

Watering the cannabis plants often and adding more fertilizer might help, but it’s not an easy process. In the end, your weed plants might suffer from nutrient excess or sustain damage from overwatering.

  • Easy to isolate pest-infested or sick weed plants

The best way to deal with sick, moldy, or pest-infested plants is to isolate them to protect the others. When it’s only one seed per pot, you can move the cannabis seedling to a treatment area.

But if you have many weed seeds per pot, the isolation process is harder to manage.

  • Nutrient deficient weed plants are treated individually

When a weed plant absorbs excess nitrogen, it might die. The solution is soil flushing using pH-balanced water. If there’s one plant per pot, the flushing won’t affect healthy plants.

You can treat the plant by giving it smaller doses of fertilizer until the cannabis seedling problem corrects itself.

Disadvantages
  • Uses too much space

Growing individual weed plants in single pots uses a lot of space. For instance, if your growing area is a standard growing cabinet, you can only fit three plants.

Multiple seeds: how many weed seeds per pot?

Growing several marijuana seeds per pot might work, but you need to plan for it.

Consider the following pros and cons before you dive in.

Advantages
  • Saves space

Growing many weed seeds per pot saves space, but you need to use a large pot to give roots space. Medium-sized indoor cannabis plants need a 5-gallon finishing pot per seed to grow healthy.

See also  Scotts Step 1 For Seeding With Weed Preventer

When growing multiple weed seeds per pot, bear in mind that each plant will need about 2 gallons of soil for every 12-inches of growth in the vegetative stage. Knowing how tall your strain of choice grows is helpful to determine how many seeds you should have in a pot.

  • Perfect for breeding weed plants

Growing males and female weed plants in a single container increase the chances of pollination. Unlike when pollen has to travel long distances.

Having many marijuana seeds per pot makes it easier to monitor the plants for good health.

Disadvantages
  • Hard to prevent accidental pollination

If you’re planting regular weed seeds for consumption, having many weed seeds per pot makes it harder to prevent pollination. As a result, you’ll get a lower yield.

FAQ

Can you plant multiple weed seeds in one pot?

Yes, you can. To avoid overcrowding, you should use a large pot and space the weed seeds evenly within it.

How long does it take for weed to sprout?

This doesn’t depend on the number of cannabis seeds per pot but on their quality. Fresh weed seeds sprout within two days, while older dried seeds take about a week. You can transfer dried weed seeds to pot soil once roots grow 5 mm long.

Can you put weed seed straight into the soil?

Yes, but you have to keep the soil moist enough throughout germination. You should bury your weed seeds twice as deep as they are wide for best results.

What happens if seeds are planted too close together?

When you have several weed seeds per pot, they’ll germinate but they’ll compete for nutrients, oxygen, light, and water. The larger weed plants will outgrow the rest and shade out their competition.

Final Thoughts

How many seeds does it take to grow weed plants?

In an ideal situation, every weed seed should germinate but this isn’t always the case.

Instead, the number of seeds you need to guarantee a female weed plant depends on seed type and germination rates.

With regular seeds, you’ll need more seeds than you would with feminized plants. On the other hand, feminized seeds cost more but they produce more female plants hence less work.

  • Cannabis Consumption
    • Edibles & Recipes
    • Ways to Smoke Marijuana
    • Cannabis News
    • Germination & Seedling Stage
    • Time to Harvest
    • Vegetative & Flowering Stage
    • Climate Control
    • Indoors 101
    • Lighting Requirements
    • Your Grow Room
    • Climate and Weather
    • Outdoor Grow Calendars
    • Outdoors 101
    • Nutrients
    • Watering
    • Beginners Guides
    • Plant & Seed Types
    • Setting Up: Tools & Equipment
    • The Cannabis Plant
    • Hydroponic Growing
    • Optimizing Yields
    • Pruning Techniques
    • Sexing & Making Seeds
    • Animal and Insect Pests
    • Fungi & Other Diseases
    • Growing Issues
    • Nutrient Problems
    • CBD

    How to Identify a Female Marijuana Seed 15 March, 2020 How to Identify a Quality Marijuana Seed Ask any e. Read Article

    Hydrogen Peroxide and Cannabis 1 May, 2020 The Benefits of Hydrogen Peroxide in Hydroponics a. Read Article

    How to Speed Up Flowering of Outdoor Cannabis Plants 2 April, 2020 A good deal of cannabis horticulturists grow their. Read Article