How Much Weed Can You Get From One Seed

Weed plants come in all shapes, sizes, and strains, so how much smokable weed will you get off one? Learn how to estimate plant yields and what factors play into it. How much marijuana does one plant produce? This article discusses some of the variables that will impact the final harvest of your cannabis plants.

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes, provided the transaction occurs within one of Maine’s actively licensed adult use cannabis stores.

Maine is home to both a medical cannabis program and an adult use industry. The medical program serves patients, while Maine’s adult use industry services consumers 21 years of age and older. Adult use cannabis and medical cannabis may not be dispensed from the same facility. Unless they have changed their license type or have a separate retail facility, existing caregiver retail stores and medical cannabis dispensaries are limited to selling cannabis and cannabis products to patients with valid medical cannabis credentials in their possession.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1501(1)(C)

How old do I have to be to consume cannabis and cannabis products?

In order to possess or use non-medical cannabis in Maine, you must be 21 years of age or older.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1501

Where can I lawfully consume cannabis?

Using cannabis in any form (smoking, eating or vaping) isn’t allowed in public places, including amusement parks, ski resorts, sporting and music venues, state and national parks, campsites, playgrounds, sidewalks and roads, cannabis retail businesses, bars, restaurants and outdoor or rooftop cafes.

So where can you use it? Cannabis use is legal within the confines of private property. Just keep in mind that property owners, landlords, and rental companies can ban the use and possession of cannabis on their premises.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1501(2)(A)

What are the rules around federal property?

Cannabis is legal under State of Maine law. Federally, it is not legal. If you’re on federal property, such as a national park or a border crossing, you can’t even have it in your possession.

See: 21 U.S.C. § 812

What are the laws on driving and cannabis use?

It is illegal to use cannabis in a vehicle. This goes for both the passenger and the driver.
It is also illegal to drive under the influence of cannabis. You could be charged with an OUI.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1501(2)(B)(1), 29-A M.R.S. §2411

How much cannabis can I possess?

Adults 21 years of age or older can possess up to 2.5 ounces of a combination of cannabis, cannabis concentrate and cannabis products, including no more than 5 grams of cannabis concentrate.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1501(1)(B)

How many plants can I grow?

Mainers can grow cannabis for personal use. As many as three mature, 12 immature plants, and an unlimited number of seedlings are allowed per resident 21 years of age or older.

These restrictions do not apply to the cultivation of cannabis for medical use by a qualifying patient, a caregiver, a registered caregiver or a registered dispensary as authorized by the Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Act.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1502(1)

What are some of the rules related to growing cannabis for personal use?

First, keep it out of sight. An adult who chooses to grow plants for personal use must make sure their cannabis is not visible from a public way without the use of binoculars or other visual aid.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1502(2)(A)

Second, make sure it’s locked up. An adult who chooses to grow their own plants must take reasonable precautions to prevent unauthorized access by individuals under the age of 21.

Finally, make sure the ownership of the plants is clear to law enforcement that may come across them. If you’re growing cannabis for personal use, the plant(s) must be tagged with a legible label that includes your name, driver’s license or state identification card number, and a notation that the plant(s) are being grown as authorized by law.

For example:
Connor S. Sample, Jr.
ID: 1234567
Personal Adult Use: Title 28-B, Section 1502

If the parcel or tract of land you are growing on is owned by someone else, you must have their written permission to grow and care for your plants and include the landowners name on each plant’s label.

See: 28-B M.R.S. §1502(1)(C) and (2)(C)

Medical Use

Patients

Who can buy medical cannabis?

Only medical patients can buy medical cannabis in Maine. Individuals who have received a patient certification from a medical professional may legally access medical cannabis from a registered caregiver or dispensary. Cards are available to Maine residents only.

Patients visiting Maine from another state may be able to purchase medical cannabis from a registered caregiver or dispensary if they have valid patient identification credentials (like a registry or patient identification card) and their state of residence allows them to use their state-issued credential to purchase medical cannabis in Maine.

What is the difference between a dispensary and a caregiver retail store?

Until recently, dispensaries were required to by nonprofit entities and there was only one per Maine Department of Health and Human Services Public Health District. At present, the most notable difference is that dispensaries can grow an unlimited number of cannabis plants.

How much does it cost to obtain a patient certification?

The cost for a patient certification depends on the medical provider conducting the examination and issuing the certification.

The Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Program provides patient cards to registered providers. In order to ensure patient access to the program, the State of Maine has never charged medical providers for the cards they provide to qualifying patients.

If an individual is interested in obtaining a medical card, they may wish to have those discussions with their primary care physician or other trusted medical provider. They may find in doing so that they are able to obtain a card at little to no cost to them.

Are temporary/digital/electronic patient certifications valid?

No. Temporary and/or digital medical cannabis patient cards or certifications are not an acceptable form of identification for the purposes of obtaining cannabis for medical use in Maine.

To be a qualifying patient in Maine’s program, among other things, an individual must possess “a valid written certification. ” A written certification is only valid if it is “a document on tamper-resistant paper signed by a medical provider. “. These requirements are written into law and aim to preserve the integrity of the medical cannabis program by reducing the possibility of altering and tampering with valid medical certifications.

The Office of Cannabis Policy provides medical providers with tamper-resistant patient certification paper at no cost.

Where can I find statistical information on the medical program?

You may be interested in reviewing the annual reports or open data of the Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Program.

Caregivers/Dispensaries/Medical Providers

What do I need to apply for or renew a registry identification card (caregiver, caregiver assistant, dispensary employee, etc.)?

Complete and submit the appropriate medical use application(s). Supplemental instructions can be found for the following:

Among other things, you will need to provide a copy of your Maine-issued driver’s license or identification card as proof of residency. Please review all materials for completeness prior to submission to ensure their timely consideration and processing.

How long does it take to get my caregiver card?

Current law requires the Department to approve or deny an initial application or a renewal within 30 days of receipt. In the case of an approval, a registry identification card must be issued within five days of approval.

The average time frame to approve an application is currently one month.

See: 22 M.R.S. §2425-A

How much do caregiver cards cost?

The cost for a registry identification card varies depending on the number of plants being grown. At most, a registered caregiver may grow 30 mature plants or 500 square feet of mature plant canopy and 60 immature cannabis plants. The application fee for a canopy caregiver is $1,500.

Applications fees corresponding to total plant count with fees growing incrementally by $240.

Mature Plants Immature Plants Fee
6 12 $240
12 24 $480
18 36 $720
24 48 $960
30 60 $1,200

See: 22 M.R.S. §2425-A, 10-144 C.M.R. ch. 122, § 8(C)(1)

Where can I find information on which states authorize their residents to use their medical cannabis credential while visiting Maine?

OCP’s guidance on visiting patients and a list of approved states can be found here: https://www.maine.gov/dafs/ocp/medical-use/certification-process/visiting-patients.

Can I conduct sales to a visiting patient who presents a medical cannabis credential and a form of identification from two different states?

No. A visiting medical cannabis patient must possess photographic identification or a driver’s license from the same jurisdiction as their valid medical cannabis credential.

See: 22 M.R.S. §2423-D.

Cultivation

Has there been a change in the law governing how I can cultivate cannabis for qualifying patients?

As of April 26, 2022, PL 2021, ch. 662, An Act To Update and Clarify the Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Act, has been in effect. That law made changes to the definition of “cultivation area” and created definitions for “immature plant canopy” and “mature plant canopy”. These new definitions were integrated into the authorized conduct for registered caregivers detailed in 22 MRS § 2423-A(3)(B) and limited for dispensaries as detailed in 22 MRS § 2428(6)(I).

What is the definition of cultivation area?

22 MRS § 2422(3) defines cultivation area as “an indoor or outdoor area used for cultivation of mature marijuana plants, immature marijuana plants or seedlings in accordance with this chapter that is enclosed and equipped with locks or other security devices that permit access only by a person authorized to have access to the area under this chapter. A cultivation area may include multiple indoor or outdoor areas, whether contiguous or noncontiguous, on the same parcel or tract of land.”

See also  Weed Control Before Seeding

I’m a caregiver. How many cultivation areas may I maintain?

Per 22 MRS § 2423-A(3)(B), a registered caregiver may maintain up to two cultivation areas – one for mature plant canopy cultivation, and another for the cultivation of immature plant canopy. The location of the registered caregiver’s cultivation areas for immature and mature plant canopy must be disclosed to the department on the caregiver’s application for, or renewal of, a caregiver registry identification card. In accordance with the changes implemented by PL 2021, ch. 662, a registered caregiver may maintain up to two cultivation areas, one for the cultivation of up to 60 immature cannabis plants or up to 1000 square feet of immature plant canopy and a second for the cultivation of up to 30 mature cannabis plants or up to 500 square feet of mature plant canopy.

How many cultivation areas may a dispensary maintain?

In accordance with 22 MRS § 2428(6)(I), registered dispensaries may maintain only one cultivation area, at a location disclosed to the department on the dispensary’s application for, or renewal of, a dispensary registration certificate. Registered dispensaries may cultivate all immature and mature cannabis plants required for the registered dispensary to assist qualifying patients.

Municipal Reimbursement

What is a qualifying expense?

For the purposes of this application, “qualifying expenses” means legal fees and costs associated with the drafting and adoption of a warrant article or the adoption or amendment of an ordinance. This includes the conduct of a town meeting or election by a municipality that opted to permit the operation of some or all adult use cannabis establishments within the municipality.

Examples of qualifying expenses include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Attorney’s fees to research, draft and revise cannabis ordinances;
  • Staff and contractor time for research and drafting of cannabis ordinances, including staff time and overtime for council/planning board/town meetings;
  • Fees associated with providing notice of election and public meetings;
  • Staff time, including overtime and stipends, and other associated expenses, for the conduct of town meetings and elections and the tabulation and publication of the results thereof;
  • Attorney’s fees associated with development of legal opinions regarding local regulations; and
  • Other costs similar to or of the same character of the kinds of expenses listed above.

My town opted-in for medical but not recreational, do we still qualify for reimbursement?

No. At this time reimbursement is only permitted for costs associated with opting in to permit some or all kinds of adult use cannabis establishments to operate within your municipality.

Do towns have to opt-in to all license types to qualify for reimbursement or do towns just need to opt-in to one or more license type?

In order to qualify for reimbursement for qualifying expenses, a municipality must opt-in to permit the operation of at least one of the following kinds of adult use cannabis establishments: cannabis cultivation facilities, products manufacturing facilities, cannabis testing facilities or cannabis stores. Please note that a municipality may submit only one application for reimbursement of qualifying expenses, so if a municipality opts in to only some types of adult use cannabis establishments and submits an application for reimbursement to OCP, the municipality would not be eligible for additional reimbursement of qualifying expenses associated with opting-in to allow additional establishment types at a later time.

What types of receipts will be accepted?

OCP will accept any kind of accounting that is detailed enough for OCP to determine whether the expenses submitted are qualifying expenses as described above. Such an accounting should provide, at a minimum, the following information:

  • The goods and/or services paid for (i.e. legal fees, newspaper advertising, overtime for staff to conduct municipal election);
  • A note regarding the salience of the goods/services paid for to the opt-in process (i.e. drafting of municipal ordinance, advertising town meeting where warrant article will be voted upon, conduct of municipal election where ordinance amendment was approved); and
  • The date of payment.

How many documents can I upload and in what format?

There is no limit on the number of documents that can be uploaded, but each uploaded document must be less than 30 MB. The following file types can be uploaded through the application portal:

How long will processing my application take?

Applications are processed by our office on a first come, first served basis. The office may temporarily postpone application processing any time the unencumbered balance in the Adult Use Cannabis Public Health and Safety and Municipal Opt-in Fund (“the Fund”) falls below $250,000.

Application processing times can vary greatly based upon the volume and completeness of reimbursement applications received and the availability of unencumbered funds in the Fund. When the available balance of the Fund falls below $250,000 in a fiscal quarter, the office may temporarily postpone processing of reimbursement applications until the Fund is replenished in the next fiscal quarter.

If the office temporarily postpones application processing, it will begin processing applications again on a first come, first served basis when funds are once again available. In determining whether an application for reimbursement is received by OCP within 3 years of opting in, OCP will use the date the application for reimbursement was submitted to OCP, not the date it was processed by OCP.

What happens after we submit our application?

Upon submission, you will receive an e-mail confirming that your application materials were submitted to OCP. OCP staff will then review your municipality’s application materials to ensure completeness.

OCP staff will review your municipality’s ordinance or warrant article to ensure that the municipality did, in fact, opt-in to permit the operation of adult use cannabis establishments within the municipality. Please ensure that the ordinance or warrant article submitted includes the effective date of the ordinance or warrant article.

OCP staff will review the accounting and any supporting documentation to determine whether all expenses reimbursed are qualifying expenses. We will reach out if it requires additional information to determine whether certain expenses are qualifying expenses.

OCP staff may determine certain expenses are not considered qualifying expenses and will provide the municipality with an opportunity to provide additional information to establish that the expenses are qualifying expenses.

If OCP determines that certain expenses submitted for reimbursement are not qualifying expenses, OCP will notify the municipality of the total amount of the expenses submitted that are considered qualifying expenses, as well as a list of those expenses not considered qualifying expenses.

Once OCP staff determines that your municipality is eligible for reimbursement for some or all the qualifying expenses submitted, you will receive an e-mail informing you that the municipality’s application has been approved for reimbursement.

Once approved, the municipality will receive reimbursement through the Advantage ID # submitted in the application materials.

We have opted-in for one kind of adult use license (e.g. only cultivation, manufacturing, testing, or sales); can we apply again for additional reimbursement if we opt-in for additional license types in the future?

A municipality may only apply for reimbursement of qualifying expenses once. The municipality may apply for reimbursement for any qualifying expenses (up to a total of $20,000 in qualifying expenses) within three years of passing or amending an ordinance or passing a warrant article. A municipality may apply for reimbursement of all qualifying expenses incurred through the process of developing or amending the ordinance or warrant article submitted as proof that the municipality opted in to permit adult use cannabis establishments within the municipality.

My town opted-in before 2022, can we still apply?

A municipality may apply for reimbursement of qualifying expenses if the municipality completed the opt-in process within three years of applying for reimbursement. However, a municipality may not submit an application for reimbursement of qualifying expenses more than three years after the municipality adopts a warrant article or adopts or amends an ordinance authorizing the operation of some or all adult use cannabis establishments within that municipality.

Do certain applications get priority over others?

No. OCP processes applications for reimbursement on a first come, first served basis. However, reimbursement of qualifying expenses may be delayed if the application is incomplete or OCP requires additional information from the applicant to determine eligibility.

I forgot to upload all the receipts for my application, what should I do?

Please contact Directory of Special Projects Tracy Jacques at [email protected] to determine how to submit any incomplete documentation.

Where do the funds used for reimbursement originate?

The Adult Use Cannabis Public Health and Safety and Municipal Opt-in Fund is funded by excise and sales tax revenues generated by the transfer and sale of adult use cannabis in accordance with 28-B MRS § 1101 and 36 MRS §§ 1818 and 4925.

General

Can I use cannabis if I am on probation?

For individuals on probation, there are rules and restrictions for cannabis that must be followed. Contact a probation officer to find out more.

Does Maine track and trace (seed-to-sale) cannabis products?

See also  Rapper Weed Seeds

Maine requires the tracking and tracing of cannabis and cannabis products in our adult use program. OCP is in the process of deploying a software solution with Metrc to allow licensees and registrants to enter their information.

Can I travel outside of Maine with cannabis?

It’s illegal to leave Maine with any cannabis products—medical or recreational. Do not cross state lines or approach border crossing with cannabis in your possession. Mailing cannabis from Maine is also illegal.

See: 21 U.S.C. § 812, CBP Statement on Canada’s Legalization of Marijuana and Crossing the Border

Why does OCP use the term ‘cannabis’ instead of ‘marijuana’?

Cannabis is the legal term used in Maine law to describe the product and establishments we regulate and license.

How much weed can you get from growing one plant?

As states legalize weed and the plant becomes more accepted, more people are trying out their green thumbs by growing their own weed at home. Most states with legal weed allow one person to grow six plants at their residence and an entire household to grow 12 plants. Some allow less, and some allow more.

(To see how many plants your state allows you to grow at home, check out this table).

But how much actual weed is that in dried buds that you can smoke? An ounce? A pound? Two pounds? The tricky thing is, all weed plants aren’t the same size, and many factors affect how big a plant will get and how dense its buds become.

We’ll go through those factors and talk a little bit about the harvest process to estimate how much weed you can get from one plant.

How much bud from one weed plant?

Many factors affect how big a plant gets, but generally speaking, if you are growing a healthy plant, you can expect these yields from one weed plant:

  • Outdoor plant: ½ pound of buds, or about 224g
  • Indoor plant: ¼ pound of buds, or about 112g

Note that these are estimates. When growing outdoors, plants can usually get massive because they aren’t restricted to space—it’s not uncommon to get closer to a pound a plant or more.

When growing indoors, you’re often limited by space—a plant can’t get as big in a grow tent as in a big, open basement. You’re also limited by how powerful your grow light is. For example, Leafly editor David Downs harvested 150g from one indoor plant with one 200W Black Dog LED light. The company said that light maxes out around a half-pound of buds, or 224g.

Also, these estimates are for healthy plants. If a plant becomes nutrient-deficient, gets bugs or mold, or doesn’t receive enough light, expect a lot less.

How long will one plant’s worth of bud last you?

However big your plant gets, you’ll likely have more flower than you know what to do with. Many people will save a certain amount of flower for smoking, and make edibles, concentrates, and other weed products with the rest of their harvest.

Consider how much weed you smoke in a day, week, or month. For reference, a gram is about two medium joints or 3-4 bowls. Do you smoke a gram a day or a week? Two grams a day or a week?

Using the above yield estimate of ¼ lb., or 112 grams, for one medium-to-large-sized indoor plant, if you smoke one gram a day, that one plant would last you 112 days, or just under four months! Two grams a day would last you just under two months, and half a gram a day—or an eighth a week—would last you eight months.

This will help give you a sense of how many plants you should grow. If you’re growing indoors, you can grow one plant at a time, harvest it, and start another, keeping a continuous cycle of growing.

If growing outdoors, you may only get one harvest a year. Remember, check out how many plants you can legally grow in your state here.

How Much Weed Does One Plant Produce?

“How can I grow as much weed as possible?” You know that’s what’s on your mind when you ask or wonder about plant yield. Old and new marijuana growers (and scientists and politicians ) alike want to know how to get the highest yield per plant and per grow. Planning and practice can make a huge difference– especially when you are only growing one plant!

But, ultimately let’s not forget that the cannabis plant is a sentient being. She’s alive! Her growth is dependent on many factors and the same plant can produce a pound in one situation and a couple grams in another. Below we will detail the known factors that impact yield and potency, discuss where things can go wrong, and where things can grow right.

What is yield? (wet vs. dry yield)

Yield is the amount of weed you get when you harvest your marijuana plants. This is only the buds themselves, removed from the stems. This is most often measured once your marijuana buds are dried and trimmed. This is generally measured in grams, ounces, and pounds. The “lid” is not a used measurement anymore.

One of the most know measurements currently is an 1/8th (of an ounce) which is 3.5 grams. This is commonly found in dispensaries as well as something one might purchase from their friendly neighborhood weed guy. In this picture below, only two perfectly grown and cured buds were needed to reach this weight!

Wet and dry cannabis does not weigh the same.

Immediately upon harvesting, your buds will be quite heavy. That’s because, like humans, freshly harvested cannabis flowers are 75 – 80% water by weight. Once dried and cured, the actual harvest you get is about ¼ of the wet weight. So, if your harvest weighs out at an ounce at first cut, when it’s all said and done, you will have a quarter ounce of homegrown weed to smoke.

To estimate your dry yield from your wet yield, just multiply the wet yield by 0.25 to get an idea of what you’ll have to share with your friends (or stash away for yourself)!

This varies slightly depending on if you grew a sativa-dominant or an indica-dominant strain. Sativas are notoriously more airy so if you weigh your sativa harvest wet, you will get 20 – 22% dry. Indicas tend to be a bit chunkier so if you weigh your indica harvest wet, you will get 22 – 25% dry.

​​Yield vs. Potency

Yield is an important factor to consider because cannabis is an annual crop; there’s only one harvest per plant. After harvest, the plant is dead and returns to compost. Yield is the weight of the buds that you harvest. Yield should not be confused with the potency of these hefty green nuggets. Potency is the strength of the cannabinoids found in the trichomes on your cannabis buds.

In other words, you can have a high yield of low potency buds. Or you can have a low yield of high potency buds. In a perfect world, you’d get a high yield of high potency buds and we are going to discuss how to make that happen!

What to do to increase your weed plant’s yield?

Let’s get the most out of your homegrown medical (and recreational) marijuana. Best plant performance and yield are the result of growing the right strains under the right conditions. The most important factors being: light, plant density, fertilizer, temperature, duration of the flowering growth stage, and plant variety. In sum, the TLDR version is:
blast as much light as you can afford, grow less plants to fill your space appropriately, feed your plants just enough but not too much, keep the space not too hot and not too cold, don’t harvest early, and don’t buy shit genetics
(bag seed gamblers are included!)

Light to Increase Weed Plant High Yield

The yield from an indoor-grown cannabis plant largely depends on the light the plant receives. Cannabis plants, being photosynthesizers, receive all their energy to function from light.

The type, quality, and amount of light you provide your marijuana plant directly influences yield and should not be taken lightly (see what we did there?)

Sunlight is the most powerful light us earthlings have access to, so if you are able to give your plant direct sunlight, do it! Sunshine is also free, and that is a big plus. The only downside is that we cannot control cloudy or rainy days and winter makes it challenging to grow with the limited amount of sunlight (the freezing temperatures also don’t help).

Moving to an indoor grow environment, w hen it comes to lighting fixtures, it does not benefit you to get the cheaper option. And we know how challenging it is to pick the right light- – there’s so many options out there! (incandescent, CFL, HPS, LEDs)

We do not encourage growers to use incandescent light bulbs when growing indoors. To get enough energy for your plant, the bulb would put off too much heat and not be fun to see on your electric bill. CFL bulbs are equally useless. Stick to new technology to protect your plants and your wallet.

While HPS light fixtures are historically the choice for those who want to maximize their indoor cannabis crop harvest, they are slowly fading out from commonplace. An experienced grower can expect to harvest a gram of weed from each watt of HPS light provided to the plant. This means that if the light is a 400-watt HPS bulb, then 400 grams of weed could potentially be harvested. However, LED light technology is getting more advanced. LEDs are: 1) cheaper to run than HPS and 2) run cooler than HPS which also lowers the cost of air conditioning and 3) reduces the likelihood of burning your plants with too much light.

See also  Are Weed Seeds Legal In Uk

When choosing an LED light fixture for your weed plants you are up against a surplus of options and information.

The most important metrics to look for in a lighting fixture are PPF, PPFD, and energy usage/efficacy . If none of these are present, you may want to look at a different fixture.

PPF, PPFD, and photon efficiency are measurements related to PAR. PAR is photosynthetic active radiation. PAR is not a unit of measurement but instead defines the type of light needed to support photosynthesis.

PPF is how much PAR a lighting system produces each second. This is not often listed as it does not show how much of the measured light actually lands on your plants but is a useful metric to calculate how capable a light fixture is at creating PAR.

PPFD (photosynthetic photon flux density) is the measurement of how much PAR actually arrives at your plant. This is a spot measurement and is typically highest at the center point beneath the light and decreases as light ripples outwardly. This changes with the distance away from the plant. Ideally, the higher the better but a single measurement won’t tell you much– you want the average taken from many measurements throughout the coverage area.

Photon efficacy is a way of defining how good a lighting fixture is at converting the electrical energy into PAR light that your plant can actually consume. This is not often listed in the spec sheet for most lights. Instead, most light manufacturers list the wattage, either total electrical watts or watts per square foot. Knowing the wattage is good to budget the main cost of your indoor cannabis grow. But the wattage doesn’t give the best information about the quality of light as watts are a measurement of the energy coming into the light fixture (from your electric bill) where photon efficacy is how good the light is at giving your plant energy.

We suggest paying attention to whether or not the company you want to buy a light from lists the actual wattage or the watt equivalent. (Hint: if they are only disclosing the watt equivalent, the light is most likely not strong enough for cannabis.)

LED wattage and incandescent wattage aren’t the same.

Many LEDs are marketed with their “incandescent equivalent” wattage, referring to the brightness of the LED. For example, a 10 watt LED may say “75 watts” on the package and in fine print say that the brightness is equivalent to a 75 watt incandescent. But for growing cannabis, you’re going to want an actual real 75 watts (or higher!) from your LED lamp .

Can I give my weed plant too much light?

The answer in fancy, science talk:

Effectively, within the range of practical indoor PPFD levels—the more light that is provided, the proportionally higher the increase in yield will be. Therefore, the question of the optimum LI [light intensity] may be reduced to more practical functions of economics and infrastructure limitations: basically, how much lighting capacity can a grower afford to install and run? – Victoria Rodriguez-Morrison, David Llewellyn , and Youbin Zheng

In plain English:

No, not really! For a vegging photoperiod cannabis plant, you will want to give her a minimum of 18 hours of light a day– some give 20 hours or even keep the lights on 24/7. We know that a lot of good growth happens during the dark period when the cannabis plant has time to rest so we suggest either a 18/6 or 20/4 light cycle for photoperiod cannabis in the vegetative stage.

Same goes with autoflowering cannabis, with an autoflower seed indoors, you’ll want to give it 20 hours light / 4 hours darkness each day.

When it comes to using light to maximize yield, maximize the light intensity to meet your budget.

Grow Less Cannabis Plants to Get More Weed

In some ways you may think that if you pop more marijuana seeds or get more clones that you will get a bigger harvest in the end. This is not always true.

Each cannabis plant wants her own space. Planting more than one seed in a pot leads to competition between plants for the shared nutrients and reduced yields. As seen in this photo below where two seedlings starved each other and both ended up dwarfed:

The size of the container that you grow your pot in matters, too. Outdoor plants have the potential of reaching extreme oak tree size when planted directly in good soil (which can be hard to find) and allowed to flourish in an open, sunny space. Indoor cannabis plants, become much like a goldfish in either a fishbowl or an aquarium or an ocean, you will grow a different size plant from the Mini Complete Pot Grow Kit (1/2 Gallon) to the Medium Complete Pot Grow Kit (5 gallon) or the Large Complete Pot Grow Kit (35 gallon) . The bigger pot, the bigger plant (and the more pot).

Growing in a grow tent, consider the total space as well as the size of your containers. It may sound like a good idea to pack a small 24’’ x 48’’ x 60’’ tent with as many pots as possible but this will limit the canopy space for your plants to fill. Best to give each pot space for the plant to fill out.

Growing less plants means:

  1. A longer vegetative stage. This means bigger plants. Bigger plants have bigger harvests and higher yield. When growing photoperiod cannabis indoors, it is time to transition your tent to flower when the tips of the leaves of each plant begin to touch. More plants touch each other faster.
  2. Less plants to manage! You know each one personally and can tell when even the slightest thing is off which means you can catch pests and diseases before they become a major problem. This also means that you will have more time for defoliation and advanced pruning techniques to maximize your yield!

In the same space with a 600 watt HPS lamp, you can either get 37.5 grams from 16 plants, 150 grams from four plants, or a pound from one single plant! Don’t compromise on plant density; the more space you give a single plant, the more she can blossom.

Best Grow Mediums to Maximize Harvest

Yield can also vary based on the particular grow medium you use. It has been clearly documented that using hydroponics to grow marijuana can result in 20 percent more yield compared to using soil indoors.

Hydroponics increases yield because it is the most efficient way to feed plants. The grower supplies all the nutrients that the plant would naturally need to find for herself in the soil.

But, hydroponic systems are also 1) more expensive to set up and run, 2) can take time (like several runs) to dial in a nutrient feeding schedule and 3) can go wrong if your plants are fed too much.

At the simplest level, fertilizers come in varying NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium) formulations. Fertilizers that are richer in nitrogen are ideal for the vegetative phase, and those richer in potassium are better suited to the flowering phase. Growing hydroponically you need to know which nutrients your cannabis plants need during their different stages of growth and have that ready.

Whether you opt for organic, inorganic, or a mixture of the two is more of a personal decision. The important thing is that your marijuana plants receive enough nutrients to give you a higher yield per plant, but never too much. Unlike light intensity, there is a sweet spot for nutrients when it comes to growing marijuana. Too much of a good thing can negatively impact your plants. Unfortunately, finding the right balance between enough nutrients and excess nutrition usually comes with experience.

Soil grown marijuana can pull down some epic yields as well. But not all soils are created equal. For example, one person growing marijuana in loam soil may have a richer harvest since loam soil is easy for the roots to penetrate. On the other hand, clay soil could lead to a dismal yield since it doesn’t easily drain and can be quite compact, making it difficult for cannabis roots to grow.

That’s why a Pot for Pot specially formulated our Superb Soil to contain just the right amount of nutrients to maximize cannabis growth. With a Pot for Pot grow kits, there’s no need to add additional fertilizer because their soil has everything your plant needs from seed to harvest . It isn’t just easy to use, it’s optimized for marijuana growth.

Our complete grow kits include everything you need to go from seed to your very own supply of high grade medical cannabis.