How To Grow Weeds From Seeds Uk

Growing weed indoors without grow lights is a lot easier than you might think. There’s only so much Netflix you can watch. Grow a pound to save money and stay sane during long bought of self-isolation from covid19. Growing weed can be easy, though some marijuana grow tutorials make it seem like you need a degree in horticulture. Learn how to plant a seed & start growing with as little time and effort as possible, or read our advanced tutorials for monstrous yields!

Can you grow cannabis indoors without lights?

Many hobbyist growers elect to use grow tents, closets, or other enclosed spaces when growing cannabis indoors, often outfitting these spaces with lights and even humidity and temperature control systems. Depending on your level of interest and enthusiasm, these systems can cost anywhere from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

But can you simply stick a cannabis plant in a nice sunny window and let it do its thing? Read on to understand what to expect if you choose to grow cannabis indoors au naturel, along with a few tips and tricks from experts to help your indoor plant thrive in a minimal setup.

The environment inside your home is perfectly safe for your cannabis plant. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Is my home a suitable environment for cannabis?

The environment inside your home is perfectly safe for your cannabis plant. It offers all the same basic benefits you enjoy, like warmth, oxygen, protection from the elements, and light.

“I make zero effort to control the climate of my grow spot. If you’re growing without a light, that plant will be just fine in regular household conditions that are suitable to us humans,” explains Jimmy B Harvests, a YouTube creator that documents his adventures in growing cannabis, along with other fruits and vegetables, at home.

What to expect when growing weed indoors without lights

Will growing a plant indoors without grow lights leave you with wonky plants? Lower yields? Less potent flower?

Not necessarily. “The more effort and energy you put into a plant, the bigger and better your harvest will be,” said Jimmy. “I think that’s a pretty universal truth in the gardening game, but I’ve definitely been surprised by how well plants can do without the elaborate tents, fans, filters, feeding systems, and so on.”

Successfully growing a cannabis plant indoors is all about covering the plant’s basic needs: air, light, temperature, water, and nutrients. So, if you get those things right, your homegrown cannabis plant could provide much more than a fun experiment. And considering that indoor cannabis plants can grow a few feet tall and equally wide, you should anticipate young plants to take up more space by the time they reach maturity.

Cannabis plants need plenty of bright light or direct sunlight. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Make sure your cannabis plant gets enough light

Cannabis plants need plenty of bright light or direct sunlight. Southeastern and southwestern exposures provide the most direct sunlight per day, followed by southern, eastern, and western. If you’re dealing with a northern exposure, your cannabis plants won’t have enough direct light to thrive. You’ll need to supplement with artificial light.

To maximize the amount of daily sunlight your plant receives, work with the seasons. The total number of daylight hours vary depending on where you are, but in the Northern Hemisphere a good rule of thumb is to germinate your seeds around the Spring Equinox.

Bottom line: Sunrooms, rooms with lots of southern-facing windows, and bay windows are all great spots for indoor cannabis plants. Aim for at least six hours of direct sunlight per day.

There are two types of plants a grower might consider: autoflowering varieties or photoperiod varieties. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Autoflower vs photoperiod plants: what’s the difference?

There are two types of plants a grower might consider: autoflowering varieties or photoperiod varieties.

Photoperiod plants need to follow a specific light schedule, particularly during the flowering period. These plants need 12 hours of complete darkness to induce flowering and throughout the flowering phase until harvest. “If you can’t get the environment dark enough, that plant is just going to keep on growing and might get too big for the space you have,” added Jimmy. Our homes are full of light, so to assure the darkness needed to induce flowering, put the plants in a closet each sundown and back out in their window each morning.

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Autoflowering plants begin flowering automatically based on their maturation. When they reach a particular age, they flower, regardless of how much sunlight/darkness they are getting. These plants do not require the complete darkness that photoperiod plants do, meaning you could leave them out and about overnight and they will be fine. Another reason you might want to choose an autoflower variety is if you’re short on time since their growth cycle is shorter than it is for photoperiod plants.

Bottom line: Photoperiod plants will require several months of your time and attention, whereas some autoflowering plants complete their life cycles in as little as 49 to 56 days. This is something folks might not consider when getting started with cannabis — you have to tend to it often and be present through the plant’s life cycle. So if you’re planning a vacation or work might take you away from home, an autoflower strain might make more sense for you.

When growing in your home’s natural environment, choose a strain that will best match up with the general temperature and humidity of your mango-colored home. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Consider your indoor climate when choosing a strain

One reason indoor growers work so hard to manipulate the growing climate with light-, temperature-, and humidity-control systems is that different cultivars have different needs and preferences.

When growing in your home’s natural environment, choose a strain that will best match up with the general temperature and humidity of your home. If you use air conditioning in the summer, then you might want to select an indica-dominant cultivar that can thrive in milder temperatures. If your home is hot and humid during the summer, then a sativa-dominant strain might be a better choice.

Experience is the best teacher when it comes to growing cannabis. Photo by: Dimitri Newman/Weedmaps

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Tips and tricks for your indoor grow

Experience is the best teacher when it comes to growing cannabis — or any plant for that matter. Consider these tips before embarking on growing weed indoors without lights.

Keep it simple to start. When it comes to your setup, “I would challenge people to try doing as little as possible on their first plant and adding in effort or equipment only to solve issues as they arise or to better future plants,” shared Jimmy.

Be a good plant parent. Keep an eye on its growth and development. Trim yellowing or dying leaves that often present at the bottom of the plant when they get shaded by the top canopy. Keep an eye out for insects and act quickly when you see them, then continue monitoring closely because pests and disease can be persistent and difficult to get rid of.

Rotate your plant. “Growing with just a window, your plant is going to bend itself towards the light constantly and will benefit from regular rotating. I was rotating my cannabis plant twice a day to keep it growing relatively upright,” said Jimmy.

Pro tip: don’t set your cannabis plant on fire. Photo by: Dimitri Newman/Weedmaps

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Flush your plant before harvesting. If you’ve been feeding your plant with synthetic nutrients or fertilizers, you’ll need to give it a good flush before harvesting. By flushing the growing medium of nutrients and fertilizers, you’ll leave the plant to use up its reserves before harvesting. It’s an important step that, if skipped, can negatively impact the final quality of your flower. Timing is important here because you don’t want to strip your plant of nutrients too early. One to two weeks before harvest is a good rule of thumb.

Keep a grow journal. There are many ready-made journals tailored specifically for growing cannabis. You can also grab a pad or notebook and jot down daily details on watering, feeding nutrients, the days or weeks in a particular growth phase (vegetation, flowering), any insects or mold issues, and so on. Having a record of a plant’s full life-cycle will help improve future plants.

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Bottom line

Managing your expectations is important, especially if this is your first attempt at home growing. Caring for and mastering the art of growing cannabis is something that takes years of experience. With time, attention, and a keen eye for detail, you can improve your outcomes with each new plant you grow, even with no lights and a minimal setup.

5 reasons why it’s the perfect time to start growing cannabis

Right now, all across the US, the President, state governors, and local officials are ordering everyone to go home and stay there. They’re trying to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which threatens to overwhelm the US healthcare system in the coming weeks.

Millions of Americans are taking mental inventory of their preferred indoor hobbies.

Trust me, Leafly’s California editor: Cannabis gardening should really be at the top of the list.

Starting a March garden benefits from perfect timing, low costs, and easy logistics. You can keep it simple, or go PhD-level deep into the hobby. And it can provide real mental health benefits.

Here’s five reasons why gardening is the way to go right now.

Self-isolating? Order cannabis online with Leafly Pickup or Delivery

The timing is perfect

Let’s face it: chances are, the government has already ordered, or will order you to stay at home for the coming weeks.

You can’t spend all day fearfully checking Twitter and spinning out.

Now is literally the best time of the year to start that special houseplant you always meant to. That’s because cannabis is a fast-growing annual weed that naturally germinates in the spring and flowers in the fall in North America.

For outdoor crops, February and March are the best months to acquire and germinate cannabis seeds in order to maximize a harvest. You can nurture the plants indoors, then transplant them outside in May when the ground is warm enough and the nights are short enough. They’ll grow big and tall through the fall.

For indoor growers, starting in March means finishing as soon as June or July. That’s awesome, because you’ll have herb for the summer!

Seed season is here. (Elysse Feigenblatt/Leafly)

Save money growing exactly what you want

Everyone loves to complain about the cost of cannabis. Well, grow your own pound and save a few thousand dollars this year.

The sun is a free source of power. One fully grown outdoor cannabis plant can potentially yield a pound of dried, cured buds. That’s enough flower to keep a one-gram-per-day gardener baked for more than a year.

Your crop will be as cheap as seeds, soil, water, and patience. If and when you do need equipment, the costs will pay for themselves over future harvests.

A home garden is also the best way to ensure your cannabis is organic. You can explicitly control what you spray or don’t spray on your plants.

And only you know your favorite strain of weed. Grow a pound of that! Even better, grow two personal favorites and cross-pollinate them in early fall. Boom—a personal designer cultivar for 2021.

You don’t really have to leave your house or yard

You don’t really need to leave your house to grow a dank pound. Many folks have gardening gear lying around.

You can order seeds online and from local licensed cannabis stores. Some of those stores deliver, or offer online ordering and pickup. Gardening equipment can also generally be ordered online, including soil, cups, dirt, lights, containers, pots, nutrients, and the like.

I’m currently firing up Black Dog LED’s all-in-one, professional-grade indoor grow kit, which starts at $2,194.53 with free shipping. The kit contains everything but the seeds, down to the duct tape—so you never have to live-action role-play the film Contagion at Home Depot.

We need hobbies today

There’s only so much Netflix you can watch.

There’s only so much Netflix you can watch.

We’re all going to need a bunch of hobbies while we’re dealing with self-isolation. You can’t spend all day fearfully checking Twitter and spinning out.

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A bit of gardening every day is a great way to focus on the now. Focusing on the needs of others, including your plants, is a healthy, productive way to lose yourself for a bit each day.

Read gardening books like Leafly freelancer Johanna Silver’s new book Growing Weed in the Garden, and Marijuana Harvest by Ed Rosenthal and David Downs. (That’s me.)

Stocking up on legal cannabis? Leafly has all your local menus

You’ll have to find a space, source supplies, and make a plan.

Make and keep a grow diary to set goals and track progress.

Join a new online community. Share your project online in forums, and get help with questions. Ed Rosenthal likes to say that cannabis isn’t addictive, but growing it can be.

The plants are different every day, and their needs change. You can name each one and give them the kind of personal attention a factory farmer never could.

Some days, the plants drink more. Other days you can almost watch them grow in real time. Pore over every detail of each seedling, making sure there’s no bugs, and they have enough light.

Now more than ever, you have the time. Plant a garden, and you will live in better rhythm with night and day, the seasons, the weather, and the soil.

Mental healthcare for the months to come

On the secret of life, French Enlightenment writer Voltaire once wrote, “Happiness lies in the cultivation of a garden.”

As I type this, over in the corner, underneath a windowsill, sit six Supreme Diesel seedlings (a mix of Jet Fuel Gelato and Sour Diesel, from Compound Genetics of Portland).

They bask in the weak winter light. Two compact fluorescent bulbs augment the sun. The seedlings’ stalks stretch to the light. Their first serrated leaves grow larger by the hour. One little girl needs help ditching her seed shell. A tiny gnat needs killing—bastard! One seed cup could use a little more soil. An hour just flies by.

Growing plants gives you something to look forward to. And, come on—we need something to look forward to right now.

When you pop new cannabis seeds, you can’t help but say a hopeful little prayer. Every gardener has a version of it, probably ever since man began agriculture.

To plant is to hope and keep faith with the cosmos. Hope for a fruitful future. Faith that it’ll happen. So many things remain beyond our control. Every gardener, no matter how agnostic, prays for sun, curses pests, and gives thanks at harvest.

Sowing seeds today is a physical, intentional way of saying: “There will be a tomorrow. The seasons will turn. The problems of now will not be forever. We will work through this. This too shall pass.”

Start Growing Weed Today!

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Looking for a growing book?

If you are interested in doing a bit of reading or would like to know more about the science behind marijuana hydroponics or horticulture, I strongly recommend viewing our page of Marijuana Grow Book Reviews.

We would love to hear about your experiences with growing cannabis. Whether you are a pro grower already or are just starting your first plant, we have learned so much from our readers both beginners and masters!

If you have any suggestions, comments, concerns, or just want to ask some questions about your marijuana grow, please contact us!