Seeded Weed

Seed-to-Sale (Metrc) OMMA uses Metrc for the statewide seed-to-sale inventory tracking system. All OMMA-licensed businesses must be fully Metrc-compliant. Quick Links Information for New Zealand officials say anti-vaccination protesters seeded cannabis during a three-week occupation. When you hear weed specialists toss around the terms large-seeded weeds and small-seeded weeds, you might wonder which

Seed-to-Sale (Metrc)

OMMA uses Metrc for the statewide seed-to-sale inventory tracking system. All OMMA-licensed businesses must be fully Metrc-compliant.

Quick Links

  • Information for All Commercial Licensees
  • Information for Dispensaries
  • Getting Started
  • Required and Optional Training
  • Monthly Reporting
  • Zero Inventory
  • FAQs
  • Important Dates
  • Contact OMMA or Metrc
  • Agreed Order (Court Document)
  • NCS Analytics
  • Pay My Fine
  • OMMA-Metrc News and Updates

All Commercial Licensees

Note: Due to data storage migration, there may be brief outages in the Metrc system from 10 p.m. Aug. 6 to 2 a.m. Aug. 7, and from 10 p.m. Aug. 12 to 2 a.m. Aug. 13.

EVERY commercial licensee must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline for full compliance was May 26.

ALL seeds, plants and products must be tagged and tracked in Metrc, except for dispensaries selling or transferring untagged products (see more in the Dispensaries section below).

Every licensee must be registered with Metrc. The owner or key administrator must have completed the New Business training offered every weekday and on-demand in Metrc Learn.

Once credentialed, licensees log in and access the Support page to find on-demand, self-paced learning modules for additional training.

Dispensaries

Like all commercial licensees, dispensaries must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline was May 26.

Dispensaries may not buy new untagged inventory. Dispensaries have through Aug. 24 to sell or legally dispose of untagged items that were in the dispensary’s inventory on May 26.

Transporters may transport a dispensary’s untagged inventory to waste disposal facilities, and waste disposal facilities can legally dispose of the untagged inventory. The untagged inventory must picked up, or have arrangements made for it to be picked up, on or before Aug. 24.

Dispensaries can conduct untagged sales from May 27 through Aug. 24. Untagged sales will need to be accounted for as described in the Monthly Reporting section.

If your dispensary purchased a Metrc-tagged product that was tested “outside” of Metrc, which means the lab did not input the results directly into Metrc, there is no deadline to sell it as long as the lab entered information into Metrc’s “Notes” section about the testing laboratory, the sample number the tests passed. Once a Metrc-tagged package has been transferred or sold to a dispensary, it does not need to be tested again as long as that information is in the notes.

Getting Started

To begin using Metrc, sign up for training to get credentialed. See more in the Required and Optional Training section below.

Required and Optional Training

Required Training

The owner or key administrator of each commercial license is required to take Metrc’s New Business class to become credentialed in Metrc.

Licensees can use the Metrc scheduler to sign up for New Business training, offered each weekday. The class is also offered on demand through Metrc Learn in your Metrc account.

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When you complete the training, reach out to Metrc’s Support team to get credentialed.

Optional Training

OMMA and Metrc hosted free educational seminars May 3-6 for growers, processors, dispensaries, transporters and waste facilities, and May 17-18 for testing laboratories.

The seminars were held in-person in Oklahoma City and streamed online. Recordings of one seminar each are posted to YouTube for growers, processors, dispensaries, transporters and waste facilities, and testing laboratories.

Other Optional Training

Metrc offers other advanced training courses on Metrc Learn and on its scheduler. Metrc also has training videos on its Oklahoma web page and its YouTube channel on the following topics (and many others):

Monthly Reporting

Dispensaries must continue using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template for any untagged sales and waste disposal through Aug. 24.

Metrc will meet the monthly reporting requirements and the template is no longer necessary for all tagged sales, transports and waste disposal after May 31.

Businesses reporting zero inventory will need to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc.

All commercial licensees were required to continue all monthly reporting using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template for activity through May 31. The last template with activity through May 31 was due June 15.

Zero Inventory

Businesses with zero inventory must still be credentialed in Metrc. Until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc, the business needs to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system.

For a comprehensive list of frequently asked questions, please view this searchable PDF.

After the Protesters Left, an Illicit Weed Began Growing in Parliament’s Garden

New Zealand officials say anti-vaccination protesters seeded cannabis during a three-week occupation.

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Anti-vaccine protesters left trash and other surprises outside Parliament in Wellington, New Zealand, this month. Credit. Mike Scott/New Zealand Herald, via Associated Press

When anti-vaccination protesters finally cleared out of New Zealand’s Parliament grounds after a three-week occupation, they left behind a scene of destruction and disorder — the charred remains of a children’s playground, camping equipment and human waste, among other items.

This week, a man eating lunch in the Parliament garden spotted something else left behind by protesters — cannabis seedlings nestled among the brassicas and marigolds.

The unidentified man told Radio New Zealand, the national broadcaster, that he might not have “inhaled” back in university, but he had a “fairly good idea” what kind of plants were sprouting “just meters away from the debating chamber.”

The discovery prompted a swift operation by groundskeepers to find, uproot and destroy the plants sneakily seeded in the Parliament’s garden in the capital, Wellington.

“We are weeding out the weed,” Trevor Mallard, the speaker of Parliament, assured New Zealanders in a statement.

The discovery raised questions about what other surprises protesters might leave behind as a new anti-vaccination group took to social media to plan another protest for Friday.

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A representative for the grounds told the national broadcaster that “a lot” of marijuana seeds had been scattered around by protesters. Seedlings for cilantro, tomatoes, other vegetables and herbs were also left behind. The man who originally found the marijuana plants pronounced it “a shame,” and added, “The law is the law.”

In New Zealand, the possession and manufacture of recreational cannabis remain illegal after 53 percent of voters voted against legalizing marijuana in a 2020 referendum. In the lead-up to the vote, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern declined to throw her support behind either side to avoid, she suggested, influencing the outcome. Later, she revealed she had voted in favor of legalization.

The protest over the country’s strict vaccine mandates lasted 23 days and attracted hundreds of people from across the country. The crowd grew to include conspiracy theorists and others who descended on the site to rage against various grievances. What began as a peaceful protest resembling a music festival ended in dramatic and sometimes bloody clashes with the police. Fires broke out. Protesters wielded fire extinguishers, paint-filled projectiles and other homemade weapons. Dozens of officers were injured.

Weeks later, relations between the New Zealand government and protesters against the vaccine mandate remain strained.

Last Wednesday, Ms. Ardern announced that the country would move away from its vaccine requirements and abandon other Covid restrictions, including ending vaccine passes in shops and other venues, even as the Omicron variant has caused widespread outbreaks.

But some groups are pushing for a complete end to those restrictions. A new anti-vaccine group announced plans to protest in Wellington on Friday, prompting workers to put up fences around Parliament and police officers to turn out.

In the end, only a few people showed up to protest at a war memorial near Parliament. The rain had begun to fall — perfect for seedlings but not, apparently, for protesters.

Heed Weed Seed Size

When you hear weed specialists toss around the terms “large-seeded weeds” and “small-seeded weeds,” you might wonder which are which and what difference it makes? Good questions.

“Weed seed size comes into play in particular with no-till and strip-till,” points out University of Wisconsin weed scientist Chris Boerboom. “With those systems, large-size weed seeds don’t get incorporated and therefore don’t germinate well. For example, velvetleaf, a medium- to larger-seeded weed, becomes much less of a problem in no-till farming.”

In contrast, Boerboom notes, small-seeded weeds and annual grasses, if not managed, can become more prevalent in no-till and strip-till. That’s because they’re able to germinate near the surface.

“When the seeds of large-seeded weeds lie on the surface, as they do with no-till, they make only one flush and are easier to control with a single herbicide application,” explains Jeff Stachler, weed scientist at Ohio State University. “Also, since they are on the surface, they are more likely to be eaten by rodents, insects and birds. Over time, because of predation, good weed control, and lack of incorporation, the number of large-seeded weeds declines in no-till fields.”

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But small-size weed seeds in no-till fields usually get incorporated by rainfall, tire tracks and other natural soil disturbances just enough to germinate, Stachler explains. Thus, they become dominant weeds.

When fields are tilled, large-seeded weed seed gets incorporated. That allows them to germinate better and over a longer period of time, says Stachler. But small-seeded weeds, when incorporated by tillage, become less competitive because they’re pushed below their optimum germination level, he points out.

Germination and growth patterns of medium-seeded types, says Stachler, fall between the large and small.

In general, he adds, large-seeded weeds are more competitive on a per-plant basis than small- or medium-seeded weeds. “The larger seeds tend to germinate faster because of more energy, and they tend to be larger weeds,” he notes. “It may take four to eight times as many small-seeded weeds to be as competitive as a single large-seeded weed.

“On the other hand, small-seeded weeds like pigweeds and lambsquarters tend to produce more seeds per plant and can spread faster,” Stachler says. “That’s the reason they can take over so quickly in no-till if not properly controlled.”

Herbicide-wise, soil-applied products such as dinitroanilines (Prowl, trifluralins), acetamides (Harness, Dual II Magnum, Lasso, etc.) and pigment inhibitors (Command, Balance, Callisto) are the most effective for small-seeded weeds, says Stachler. Except for the few products that need incorporation, all can be used with no-till.

Pre-emergence PPO inhibitors (Authority, Valor, etc.) control mostly small- and medium-seeded weeds. “To control large-seeded weeds with pre-emergence products, go with triazines or ALS-inhibitors, assuming there is not a resistance problem,” Stachler advises. “They also get medium- and small-seeded weeds.”

As a rule, large-seeded weeds are more difficult to control with pre-emergence herbicides than are small-seeded weeds, notes Wisconsin’s Boerboom. “That’s partly because they emerge from a greater depth and don’t take up as much herbicide as do those weeds that germinate near the surface. We can usually control large-seeded weeds more effectively with post products.”

Boerboom points out that most pre-emergence grass killers, especially for corn, also are touted to help control small-seeded broadleaf weeds. But, he says it’s important to keep in mind that their control can vary depending on the broad-leaf. When those grass herbicides are premixed with atrazine, control is good and consistent for most small-seeded broadleaves.

Weeds And Their Seed Sizes

The following list of broadleaf and grass weeds, found in the Midwest, comes from Ohio State University:

Large-seeded broadleaf weeds: common cocklebur, giant ragweed, the morningglories, common sunflower and burcucumber.

Medium-seeded broadleaf weeds: common ragweed, velvetleaf, jimsonweed, smartweed, Canada thistle, kochia and common dandelion.

Small-seeded broadleaf weeds: pigweeds (including waterhemp), lambsquarters, eastern black nightshade, marestail, field pennycress, chickweed, purple deadnettle, wild mustard and shepherd’s-purse.

Large-seeded grass weeds: shattercane, johnsongrass, field sandbur, woolly cupgrass, downy brome and wild oats.

Medium-seeded grass weeds: foxtails, barnyardgrass and wild proso millet.