Weeds And Seeds Recipe

A nutritional rock-star superfood blend, Weeds & Seeds is certified organic, RAW, vegan, gluten-free, high-in-fibre, and free from lactose & GMOs! This ramen noodle salad with cabbage, almonds, and sunflower seeds is light and crunchy. A simple vinaigrette ties all the flavors together! stir fried noodles with weeds and seeds One several possible variations of this recipe are staples of my diet, and this is an excellent way to get your daily dose of wild foods. Even

Weeds And Seeds Recipe

A nutritional, plant-based superfood blend, Weeds & Seeds is organic, non-GMO, vegan, lactose and gluten FREE, high in fibre, protein + antioxidants, 0 % sugar/serving and RAW! Add to yogurt, mylks, smoothies, granola, salads and more, and be sure to check out our recipe page for more ideas! Weeds & Seeds packs a powerful punch of wholesome nutrition in only 2 tablespoons per day!

Weeds & Seeds Combo (12/PK – 6 of Each)

Weeds & Seeds Classic Blend

Weeds & Seeds Classic (12-PK)

Weeds & Seeds Wildberry

Weeds & Seeds Wildberry (12-PK)

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Made in BC

Not just any weeds.

Weeds & Seeds survival cereal is a nutritional rock star, with many ingredients locally and ethically harvested. Using over 95% organic ingredients, it is raw, vegan, high in dietary fibre, 0% sugar per serving and gluten, lactose and GMO free – just to name a few of its nutritional benefits!

But we feel it’s the weeds in Weeds & Seeds that sets us apart from similar products out there. Powerhouses like dandelion and plantain leaf are chalked full of antioxidants and immune boosting vitamins A and C. Both are said to be powerful healers, used to purify the blood, address digestion-related problems, and prevent piles and gallstones, among other maladies. Traditional herbal medicine practices use dandelion for their diuretic effect used to rid the body of excess fluid, which can lead to lowered blood pressure.⁠

Versatility is another quality this product boasts. Just add two tablespoons to granola, yogurt, milks, smoothies, oatmeal, salads or baking, and you’re well on your way to a healthy gut and meeting your daily nutritional requirements!

Top Ramen Salad

This ramen noodle salad is light and crunchy. It’s excellent with BBQ chicken. This recipe is from my mother-in-law and has been a family favorite for years.

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Recipe Summary

Ingredients

  • 2 (3 ounce) packages chicken-flavored ramen noodles, broken into pieces, seasoning packets reserved
  • ½ cup raw sunflower seeds
  • ½ cup slivered almonds
  • 1 (16 ounce) package coleslaw mix
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Step 1
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Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Spread ramen noodles, sunflower seeds, and almonds onto a baking sheet.

Bake noodle mixture in the preheated oven until fragrant and toasted, 10 to 15 minutes. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

Combine coleslaw mix and green onions in a large bowl; sprinkle cooled noodle mixture over the top.

Make dressing: Whisk olive oil, reserved ramen seasoning packets, vinegar, sugar, and black pepper together in a bowl until smooth.

Pour dressing over noodle mixture and toss to coat.

450 calories; protein 9.9g; carbohydrates 34.9g; fat 31.1g; cholesterol 6.1mg; sodium 323.9mg. Full Nutrition

Reviews ( 32 )

Most helpful positive review

I have been making and eating this salad for years. This is a good recipe to start, but don’t be afraid to try other flavors of Raman. Also, try adding more veggies. Broccoli slaw works well alone or with the coleslaw, chop up some celery for more crunch. Diced peppers, cucumber, radishes, etc. I think you get the point. Use whatever you like to eat. The other variable is the vinegar. There are many different flavors of vinegar. If you are like me, you will never eat the same salad twice.

Most helpful critical review

Not sweet enough. Had tried another recipe for this salad and found it much more Asian tasting. The vegetable and topping mixture was very good, but the dressing was lacking. Won’t make again.

  • 5 star values:

I have been making and eating this salad for years. This is a good recipe to start, but don’t be afraid to try other flavors of Raman. Also, try adding more veggies. Broccoli slaw works well alone or with the coleslaw, chop up some celery for more crunch. Diced peppers, cucumber, radishes, etc. I think you get the point. Use whatever you like to eat. The other variable is the vinegar. There are many different flavors of vinegar. If you are like me, you will never eat the same salad twice.

Add sesame oil to the dressing instead of regular for flavor

I have made this for years, but I add a can of drained mandarin oranges and one pound of chicken tenders, chopped into bite size and sauteed to make it a meal instead of a side dish. I also use apple cider vinegar vs white and the Oriental Flavor Ramen Noodles vs the Chicken Flavor. Always a hit!

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stir fried noodles with weeds and seeds

One several possible variations of this recipe are staples of my diet, and this is an excellent way to get your daily dose of wild foods. Even significantly simplified versions of this recipe are great, and please feel encouraged to substitute the ingredients as taste and practicality indicate.

Here’s what you’ll need.

One half to one third package of Eden brand Extra Fine Pasta, Pesto Ribbons, or any other variety that floats your boat. Egg Noodles of any kind, really, will work.

1 large or 2 medium carrots (wild carrots will work fine, but I do miss the nice orange color in the finished dish. )

a Burdock root. these can vary widely in size. you want about an equal to slightly smaller quantity in proportion to the carrots.

1-3 Jerusalem Artichokes (or “sunchokes”)

1 Shallot clove (or section, or segment or whatever you call it. )

1-2 Garlic cloves

Fresh Dandelion greens

Fresh Ox Eye Daisy leaves and/or flowers

Fresh Lamb’s Quarters

(please remember you can substitute whatever other fresh edible greens you have available)

Ground Flax seed

Some Balsamic Vinegar

Butter or Oil (butter really does taste better)

Parmesan cheese (personally, I prefer shredded to grated)

A skillet (or wok) & a stove (or fire)

Start by cutting your Carrots, Burdock, Jerusalem Artichokes into slivers, slices, discs, matchsticks, or whatever shapes turn you on. Then mince up the garlic and shallots and set aside.

Gather your Basil & wild greens and cut them up. You may have noticed I didn’t specify quantities; this is because I never measure. Saying “Liberal Quantities” would be my guide to you. I’m well aware that Dandelions are kind of bitter, and know how to eyeball them to my taste. If you still have trepidations about adding too much bitterness, taste your Dandelions, and add them in smaller bunches as you make the dish. I do use them right through fall myself, and never recommend the old, “Boil them and throw out the water” method. that’d really kill em. When all cut up, set the greens aside (if you’ve gathered fresh Stinging Nettle, keep this seperate).

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Boil your noodles, and be sure not to overcook (they’ll stick together and won’t stir fry as well). When done, rinse and set aside.

Heat your skillet or wok, then add a couple tablespoons of oil or 3 or 4 tablespoons of butter. When melted, throw in your root vegetables and stir fry them around till they get a bit tender. If you gathered fresh Nettles, add them now.

After your roots seem to be getting tender, and perhaps your Nettles are starting to looked cooked enough not to sting you, add the noodles. Stir around to mix the roots and noodles, and keep stirring as needed to avoid burning the bottom of the noodles to the pan. Add garlic powder to taste (I usually do 2 or 3 good dustings). If your using dried Parsley, add it now as well (to taste). GENTLY sprinkle some balsamic vinegar over the noodles, but don’t overdo it. you can always add more, but you can’t undo a big “glug”.

Keep stirring, and taste the noodles every so often. Some people like to cook them long enough till they dry out a bit, some people like them wetter. it’s up to you. When they taste good, add the liberal helping of fresh greens, and liberal quantities of ground flax and sesame seeds. Stir around till well mixed, but don’t let the greens wilt to much in the heat.

Scoop out onto plates or into bowls and garnish with more seeds and liberal helpings of parmesan cheese, and devour at will.

This dish becomes absolutely divine if prepared with fresh Hen of the Woods (Grifola frondosa) mushrooms. You can also add shiitakes or portabellas or morels or whatever fungus you like best. just add them after the roots and before the noodles. This is also an excellent accompaniment to venison, marinated in Worchester sauce and red wine, with maybe a bit of this sauce thrown in along with the vinegar.

For a drink to enhance your meal, red or white wine will both work, depending on what your serving it with, but I really enjoy it best with a good hard cider. Woodchuck is pretty good, but sweet. Strongbow or Blackthorn are very tasty imported dry ciders, and worth having, if you can find ’em.